High Plains Raceway development in Colorado, New auto racing race tracks

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Development of the High Plains Raceway

March 18, 2008 by  
Filed under Features

Auto racing enthusiasts are thrilled that plans for the High Plains Raceway in Colorado are well underway. The closure of the Second Creek Raceway in 2005 was a blow to the auto racing clubs that had been making use of this racing facility for many years. The lack of a suitable alternative auto racing venue has been putting the brakes on growth opportunities in club racing.

Initial plans for High Plains Raceway include obtaining all the necessary permits, designing the track and, most importantly, raising the money to make the project a reality. Five auto racing clubs are involved in the fundraising efforts, under the entity CAMA (Colorado Amateur Motorsports Associates), and member donations along with sponsorships by local companies have made great strides towards the goal of raising the $3,000,000 required for Phase I. Members of CAMA are Motorcycle Roadracing Association (MRA), Rocky Mountain Vintage Racing (RMVR), Porsche Club of America Rocky Mountain Region (PCA-RMR), Multi-Car Club Alliance (MCCA) and Colorado Region of the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA). The Multi-Car Club Alliance incorporates eight other car clubs. Clearly there is an urgent need for the High Plains Raceway to be completed, and organizers anticipate being able to race at the new race track before the end of 2008.

The 460 acre rectangular property is situated about a 30 minute drive east of the old Second Creek Raceway on U.S. High 36. The rolling terrain will give the track at High Plains Raceway a number of significant elevation changes, a feature which is considered to be the hallmark of memorable race tracks. There are adequate flat areas to accommodate a large paddock and, at a later stage, an autocross/skid pad. The proposed configuration is approximately 2,5 miles with 15 turns and several elevation changes. Phase one of High Plains Raceway will only make use of about half of the available acreage and the autocross/skid pad will fall into phase two.

There are many advantages to having a CAMA-controlled raceway, the most obvious being that CAMA member auto racing clubs will be in a position to control their own track destiny. Organizers are confident that High Plains Raceway will open up exciting developments in the club auto racing world.

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