36th Rolex Monterey Historic Automobile Races 2009

June 10, 2009 by  
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Paddocks filled with breathtaking cars wait for visitors at this years’ Montery Historic Races, which pays tribute to the auto racing industry. Automobiles from the past and present will take to the track in their respective categories, and bring racing history to life from the 14th to the 16th of August 2009.

Information in regard to the 36th Rolex Monterey Historic Automobile Races can be found on their website: www.montereyhistoric.com

Date: August 14, 2009
Venue: Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca
City: Monterey, California
Country: United States of America

Reference

June 5, 2009 by  
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Everything you need to know and more about the fast-paced world of Auto Racing, all right here in one spot on one site!

Pontiac Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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Produced by the Pontiac division of the General Motors Corporation, the Pontiac Grand Prix was first introduced as a full-size model in 1962. The term ‘Grand Prix’ has also been used to describe personal luxury cars and mid-sized cars. In its first year the car was basically a standard Pontiac Catalina coupe with little external chrome trim and sportier interiors. The cars could be beefed up with any of the options on the Pontiac performance option list and a handful were even fitted with the Super Duty 421 powertrain.

The Pontiac Grand Prix continued to do very well in the 1960s and its minimalist exterior trim was seen as a positive aspect. However, some considered it to be a lesser model than other personal luxury cars available at the time though the Grand Prix had a much stronger performance image than other cars in the same market at the time. Over the years the car was restyled somewhat and the rear window was made concave while the front made use of rather exclusive grillework. The interiors remained luxurious with as many bits and gadgets being fitted as was probably possible. Though the bucket seats that were fitted in the car were popular, consumers had the option of having a bench seat with folding armrests fitted as an alternative if they wanted to at no extra cost.

In 1969, the Grand Prix was once again re-styled. The new styling was based on a slightly longer version of the GM A platform. It was smaller, lighter and had its own body. Though it fell into the intermediate category, it enjoyed a whole new level of luxury and style. This downsizing was incredibly successful and the luxurious interior features a wraparound cockpit-styled instrument panel. It was also the first time that the Grand Prix featured a concealed radio antenna, a rear window defogger and side-impact beams. In 1988 the first Pontiac Grand Prix coupe became a reality. While the sedan version, which had emerged sometime earlier, had not been terribly successful, the coupe was immensely popular. The Pontiac Grand Prix has continued to undergo many interesting developments over the years. As of 2006 the Grand Prix was one of Pontiacs most popular vehicles in production, with 2008 being its last year of production.

Muscle Cars

February 9, 2009 by  
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The golden age of the Great American Muscle Car began in approximately 1964 and ended in 1971, although these dates are arbitrary. Most people agree that the Pontiac GTO, actually an option package available on the Tempest intermediate car for 1964 and ’65, was the first true muscle car and set the trend for other manufacturers to follow. With its 389 cubic inch V8 and a Hurst shifter to channel the power to the red-lined tires, the GTO made a very big impression. Pretty soon everyone wanted in on Pontiac’s game, and the late 1960s saw legendary muscle cars from Chrysler (Plymouth Barracuda and Dodge Challenger), Ford (Mustang Boss 302 and Boss 429, Mercury Marauder) and Chevy (Chevelle SS 396, Corvette 427). The Buick grand Sport and Olds Cutlass 442 were other offerings from GM. Even AMC got in on the act with its fearsome Rebel Machine and AMX models.

Sadly, like all good things, the bubble had to burst. Dropping a powerful engine into a small car might sound like a great idea to you and I, but the insurance companies and highway safety regulators were hearing a different tune – one played to the sound of rising accident rates caused by too much power in inexperienced hands. By the early 1970s, horsepower ratings were in steep decline and monster engines like Chrysler’s 426 Hemi were history. A very special era in automotive history had come to an end. These days, classic muscle cars can be purchased from dealers who specialize in finding, restoring and re-selling them. Muscle cars are also sold by private individuals, often on the Internet. The right muscle car with original parts and rare options can bring 10 to 20 times its original sale price at auction.

Muscle Cars:

Pontiac Tempest Le Mans/GTO

February 9, 2009 by  
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From 1962 to 1981 the Pontiac division of General Motors produced solid, intermediate-sized automobiles called the Pontiac LeMans. Then in 1982 the smaller Pontiac Bonneville model replaced the LeMans.

The LeMans was introduced as the top-line version of the smaller and more solid Pontiac Tempest and had more luxurious trimmings and a sportier look than the Tempest. In 1964 when the Tempest was restyled and enlarged in the form of the LeMans, it continued to have the same 326 cubic inch V8s and 215 cubic inch six-cylinder found in the regular Tempest.

Not long after the 1964 model was produced, the LeMans came out with an alternative performance package assigned as the GTO or the Gran Turismo Omologate. This version came with a lot of technical developments and upgrades, costing just under US$300. It was estimated that 5,000 GTOs would be sold that year but the sales ended up being 32,000, thereby accounting for a substantial portion of the Tempest and LeMans sales.

In 1996 the GTO was made separate from the other models, having the basic shape of the LeMans and Tempest models. The GTO kept the big-engined muscle car style where as the Tempest and the LeMans models received a new SOHC 230 cubic inch six-cylinder engine.

During the late 1960’s the Sprint-optioned LeMans and Tempest models were not as popular as the larger-engined GTO that was fueling the muscle car wars. Those that bought the normal regular LeMans and Tempest models mostly ordered V8 power, as the 326 and the later 350 cubic inch V8 version were the most ordered engines. In 1969 the SOHC six-cylinder engine and the Sprint option were stopped and replaced by an ordinary Chevrolet-built 250 cubic inch OHV six-cylinder engine, which became the base engine in most of the Pontiac intermediates.

When the LeMans was first produced it included a convertible and a pillared coupe with no hardtop option offered in the Tempest. Then in 1964 the hardtop coupe was added followed by the four-door pillared sedan a year later. In 1966 and 1968 the four-door hardtop and then a four-door Safari wagon replaced the previous versions. Over the decades the Pontiac continued to change its style, adding many amazing features and continued to be popular cars.

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