Timo Glock

March 23, 2010 by  
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Formula One driver Timo Glock was born on 18 March 1982 in Lindenfels, Germany. He began karting in 1998 and won various championships. By 2000 he was competing in the BMW ADAC Formula Junior Cup, which he won. Then in 2001 Glock took the Formula BMW ADAC Championship title.

Timo Glock moved to competing in the German Formula Three championship in 2002. That year he came in third place overall. The following year he came fifth in the Formula Three Euroseries, after three race wins and three other podium finishes. In 2004 Glock made the move to Formula One racing, where he competed in a few races for Jordan Grand Prix. He managed to score two points during his debut race, the Canadian Grand Prix.

2005 saw Timo Glock heading to the United States to take part in the Champ Car World Series as part of the Rocketsports team. He ended the season in 8th position and was awarded the Champ Car World Series’ Rookie of the Year. Glock decided to give the GP2 Series a go in 2006, and finished the season fourth in the standings, with two wins. That same year he began testing for BMW Sauber’s F1 team and was signed up to be the second test driver for the 2007 season. In 2007, as well as testing for BMW Sauber, Glock won the GP2 Series after 5 victories.

A talented driver, Timo Glock, was signed on by Toyota for the 2008 Formula One season. He certainly impressed in his first season, gaining second place in Hungary, ending the season with 25 points and coming in tenth in the standings. The 2009 season started off reasonably well for Glock and he was able to come in third in Malaysia and second in Singapore. An accident during a qualifying round in Suzuka, resulted in cracked vertebrae and Glock was unable to complete the season.

With Toyota pulling out of Formula One by the end of 2009, Timo Glock’s future in F1 racing was uncertain. Fortunately he was signed on by Manor Grand Prix (now Virgin Racing) for the 2010 season.


February 9, 2009 by  
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The Champ Car World Series, which was formerly known as Championship Auto Racing Teams or CART is the name of an Open Wheel World Championship auto racing series. It replaced CART in 2004 after the Championship Auto Racing Teams Inc. filed for bankruptcy. Roger Penske, Pat Patrick and Dan Gurney originally founded the organization in 1978 along with several other team owners who had been regularly participating in various CART and IndyCar events.

Originally CART oversaw the sanctioning of Champ Car racing in the US, Canada, Mexico and Australia. Today the Champ Car World Series performs this task. Championship Car racing differs from Formula One (or F1) racing in many ways, although the cars themselves may appear very similar to the casual eye. For example, Champ Car racing usually takes place on oval tracks, cars are permitted turbocharged engines and the cars use methanol for fuel rather than gasoline. In addition, Champ Cars are about 15% heavier than F1 cars and have sculpted undersides that produce ground-hugging forces – a practice banned by the Formula One governing board in 1982. Perhaps the main difference in the two types of racing is the expense: Formula One being a much more costly endeavor due to the requirement that teams build and prepare their own chassis. Champ Car teams source their cars’ chassis from a number of independent suppliers, which fosters competition and keeps costs down.

Most modern Champ Cars use turbocharged engines built by Ford Cosworth. Although only displacing 162 cubic inches, these methanol-fueled powerhouses put out an astonishing 850 horsepower in full racing trim – enough to propel the 1,550-pound Champ Cars to a pavement-blistering 240 mph!

Champ Car World Series Website

Jacques Villeneuve

February 9, 2009 by  
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Jacques Joseph Charles Villeneuve was born in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, Canada on the 9th of April 1971. At the tender age of eleven years, Jacques Villeneuve lost his well-loved and much respected father, Gilles Villeneuve, a Formula One driver, during a qualifying round at the Belgian Grand Prix in 1982. Jacques Villeneuve followed his father’s footsteps in his career choice and is currently a successful Canadian automobile racing driver having won the Formula One World Championship in 1997, the Champ Car Championship in 1995, as well as the Indianapolis 500. This makes Villeneuve one of only three drivers to ever have accomplished all three feats, the other two drivers being Mario Andretti and Emerson Fittipaldi.

Jacques‘ uncle also named Jacques, was also into racing and was moderately successful at it, even winning one IndyCar race. Villeneuve began his racing career with kart racing, quickly moving up the ranks. He went to various racing schools and his talent was clearly recognizable. He took part in the Italian Formula Three series between 1989 and 1991, then the Japanese Formula Three series in 1992.

In 1993, Villeneuve moved to the North American Toyota Atlantic racing series, where he successfully finished his debut season ranked third due to the five races he had won. The following year he moved to Champ Car Racing where he found himself Rookie of the Year. He then drove the new Reynard chasis with a Ford Cosworth engine for expatriate Australian Barry Green’s team, helping him finish second in the Indianapolis 500. Jacques’ strong performances and his family name brought him to the attention of Frank Williams, who wasted no time in signing him up into his Formula One team. This led to Villeneuve testing the Williams F1 car once the IndyCar season had ended.

The year 1996 saw Jacques Villeneuve put on a spectacular performance by becoming the second Formula One driver to ever achieve pole position as well as podium position on his maiden grand prix. That year he won four races with a total of 78 points, having reached the podium 11 times, all of which are rookie records.

Over the years, Villeneuve has taken part in and continues to take part in a variety of Motor Sports, including NASCAR, Le Mans, Speedcar and Top Race V6.

Milwaukee Mile

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Milwaukee Mile is a racetrack found in West Allis, Wisconsin, USA. It has been one of the main venues for American motor sports since 1903, holding at least one race a year. It is officially the oldest operating motor speedway throughout the world, with Indianapolis Motor Speedway beginning eight years later in 1911. The Milwaukee Mile has played a large part in determining the face of auto racing during the past century.

Before 1953 the Milwaukee Mile was operated as a dirt track, but was paved in 1954, leaving the dirt infield track for weekly programs that took place during the 50’s and 60’s. It was repaved again once the 1967 season came to a closure and by 1970 the quarter mile dirt track and the half-mile road course were converted to accommodate the pit area.

The Legendary Oval has a list of past winners that are part of racing history, including names such as Dale Earnhardt Jr., Barney Oldfield, Parnelli Jones, Rex Mays, A.J. Foyt, the Unsers and the Andrettis. The track is also known for being the only track to hold races for the Indy Racing League, NASCAR and the Champ Car World Series. NASCAR used Milwaukee for two Busch Series stock car races in 1984 and 1985. In 1993 the NASCAR Busch Series went back to Milwaukee where Steve Grissom won the event. Since then the Busch Series has been running every year from the Milwaukee Mile. Similarly the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series began its course in Milwaukee in 1995 and has returned every season.

After hosting NASCAR and IndyCar Series races for many years, it was announced at the end of 2009 that the Milwaukee Mile would not be hosting any events for these two sanctioning bodies in 2010. Instead the races traditionally held in Wisconsin will be hosted by Road America. Nevertheless, this legendary oval will no doubt continue to play a role in hosting other auto racing events.

2009 IndyCar Schedule Gets Two New Venues

August 4, 2008 by  
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After a lot of reorganizing in seems the IndyCar Series is getting ready for a great season next year. They recently announced their 2009 schedule, which not only featured eighteen different races, but revealed two exciting new racetrack venues. The changes extend the championship by an entire month and will no doubt prove to be very popular with auto racing fans.

The 2009 IndyCar Series schedule promises to offer drivers and fans one of the most diverse ranges of challenges in motor sports. The new schedule not only features 10 oval races, but also includes three permanent road circuits and five temporary courses. Many of the venues are not new to the IndyCar Series as they hosted the event this year, but there are two new venues to look forward to. The exciting action will start on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida, on April 5 – giving the 2009 season a great kick off. After that it will be moving to the Streets of Long Beach where the IndyCar Series will be making its debut at a venue that has already hosted F1, CART and Champ Car races during the course of its 35 year history. The series will then move from street circuits to ovals for a while, starting with the Kansas Speedway on April 26. It will go on to be hosted at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, The Milwaukee Mile, The Texas Motor Speedway, the Iowa Speedway, the Richmond International Raceway, the Watkins Glen International, the Streets of Toronto, the Edmonton City Center Airport and the Kentucky Speedway. The races at the Texas Motor Speedway, the Richmond International Raceway and the Kentucky Speedway will all take place at night, giving the season’s program even more variation.

The action will then move on to two road courses – the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course and the Infineon Raceway, before hitting the Chicagoland Speedway for another great night race. After that it’s off to The Raceway at Belle Isle Park, a brilliant 2.906-mile street course, before returning to oval racing at the 1.5-mile Twin Ring Motegi. The exciting season of racing will conclude at the Homestead-Miami Speedway and will take place on October 11. No doubt the 2009 racing season will provide fans with all the fun and excitement that they have come to expect from the IndyCar Series and we look forward to the new season with pleasure. However fans should note that venues may still be subject to change.

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