Open Car & Truck Show 2014

November 20, 2013 by  
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The 8th Annual Open Car & Truck Show features Top 40 Best of Show Awards for Cars and Trucks; Top 40 Best of Show Awards for Corvettes and a host of other awards and events. For more information visit

Date: 12 January 2014
Venue: Renegade Corvette Club
City: Sunrise
State: Florida
Country: United States

Mark Donohue

February 9, 2009 by  
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Born in Summit, New Jersey, on 18 March 1937, Mark Neary Donohue Junior was a brilliant American racecar driver. Mark Donohue had a reputation for being able to set up his own car and drive it consistently. The bachelors degree in Mechanical Engineering that he received from Brown University in 1959 must have certainly helped him in this regard. He started racing casually at the relatively young age of 22 in a 1957 Corvette – the car which gave him his first win. He started networking with a number of different SCCA drivers and eventually met Walt Hansgen. Hansgen was an experienced race driver who recognised Donohue’s talent and became his mentor. He encouraged Donohue to make good use of both his natural driving talent and his great working knowledge of vehicle mechanics – something which always proved to be an advantage to Donohue.

In 1965, Hansgen invited Mark to co-drive a Ferrari 275 at the Sebring Endurance Race. The team finished eleventh in the race and Donohue was catapulted onto the international sports car racing scene. The following year Donohue was signed up to drive a GT-40 MK II racecar for the Ford Motor Company. His first year with the company was rather unsuccessful and he finished 51st. The following year, he again raced for Ford – this year with much more success. Despite constant disagreements with his co-driver Bruce McLaren, the team managed to finish 4th in the endurance classic. In 1967, Mark Donohue dominated the United States Road Racing Championship in a Lola T70 MkIII Chevy. He was driving for Roger Penske – one of the most influential figures in his racing career. During that year he won six of the eight races he competed in. The following year, Donohue continued to enjoy a superior season – dominating in most of the races despite mechanical problems with his McLaren M6A Chevrolet.

Things continued to go well for Mark Donohue and before long he started his Trans-Am career which was also highly successful. He raced his first Indianapolis in 1969, finishing seventh and taking the rookie of the year award. The following year he finished second and in 1972 he won the race. During all this time he continued to drive for Roger Panske. In 1973, Donohue took to NASCAR racing driving in the Winston Cup Series. During this time Penske had been working with Donohue to help develop the 917/10 Porsche. Donohue offered his extensive enginnering knowledge to help make the Porsche the best car on the track – though not all the choices he made where good ones. Before long the two started working on the 917-30 – the car which came to be known as the ‘Can-Am Killer’. The body was completely reworked to make it more aerodynamic, while the car features a 5.4 litre turbocharged Flat-12 engine which could reach an output of 1500 bhp. The car dominated every competition it entered, except one, and is still today seen as one of the most dominant racing cars to ever be created. Donohue went on to enjoy a short Formula One racing career before his untimely death in 1974 in a racing accident. He was eventually inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1990.

Muscle Cars

February 9, 2009 by  
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The golden age of the Great American Muscle Car began in approximately 1964 and ended in 1971, although these dates are arbitrary. Most people agree that the Pontiac GTO, actually an option package available on the Tempest intermediate car for 1964 and ’65, was the first true muscle car and set the trend for other manufacturers to follow. With its 389 cubic inch V8 and a Hurst shifter to channel the power to the red-lined tires, the GTO made a very big impression. Pretty soon everyone wanted in on Pontiac’s game, and the late 1960s saw legendary muscle cars from Chrysler (Plymouth Barracuda and Dodge Challenger), Ford (Mustang Boss 302 and Boss 429, Mercury Marauder) and Chevy (Chevelle SS 396, Corvette 427). The Buick grand Sport and Olds Cutlass 442 were other offerings from GM. Even AMC got in on the act with its fearsome Rebel Machine and AMX models.

Sadly, like all good things, the bubble had to burst. Dropping a powerful engine into a small car might sound like a great idea to you and I, but the insurance companies and highway safety regulators were hearing a different tune – one played to the sound of rising accident rates caused by too much power in inexperienced hands. By the early 1970s, horsepower ratings were in steep decline and monster engines like Chrysler’s 426 Hemi were history. A very special era in automotive history had come to an end. These days, classic muscle cars can be purchased from dealers who specialize in finding, restoring and re-selling them. Muscle cars are also sold by private individuals, often on the Internet. The right muscle car with original parts and rare options can bring 10 to 20 times its original sale price at auction.

Muscle Cars:

Sports Cars

February 9, 2009 by  
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Sports cars inhabit that enticing and appealing area somewhere between standard daily driving workhorses and full-out racecars. As such, they sacrifice some practicality in favor of performance and excitement. Commonly, sports cars are two-seaters with two doors and are designed for decisive acceleration, high speed driving, tight and responsive handling, and of course gorgeous looks. The Chevrolet Corvette is a classic American sports car, equally at home on the racetrack or your driveway (if you’re so lucky!). Some sports cars, like the Shelby Cobra, trace their evolution from cars built for racing purposes, while others such as modern day Ferraris and Lamborghinis are used only as luxury cars.

Sports cars used in racing must be extremely maneuverable, have a low weight and center of gravity, excellent braking and of course, LOTS of horsepower. Luxury sports cars are still terrific performers, but also excel in the areas of comfort and noise reduction. In all types of sports cars, emphasis is placed on the handling of the vehicle so that drivers can maintain control in challenging conditions. BMW is renowned for the excellent handling designed into their cars, making even their larger sedans handle like true sports cars. If you’re thinking about buying a sports car, bear in mind that insurance on sports cars is generally higher due to the perception among insurers that sports cars will be driven in a, well, “sporty” manner. Look around for a sports car insurance company that has affordable rates.

If laying out cold hard cash for the sports car of your dreams doesn’t fit the budget right now, you can rent sports cars like the Audi TT Roadster, Porsche Boxster and more from sports car rental companies. Renting a sports car is a great way to experience these amazing vehicles.

Corvette’s New Releases

February 19, 2007 by  
Filed under Features

2007 will be a grand year for Corvette as fans of the brand will certainly be impressed with the newest special-edition models. These are the Ron Fellows ALMS GT1 Champion Corvette Z06 and Indianapolis 500 Pace Car Replica Corvette Convertible. These two exceptional vehicles have been designed with unique exterior and interior features. Only a limited number of these special edition Corvettes will be manufactured for sale to the public.

Ron Fellows, well-known in the auto racing fraternity, has a long association with the Corvette Racing team. In fact, it was Ron Fellows who was part of the development team for the championship C5.R car which took the title at the American Le Mans Series GTS-class back in 2002. The long-lasting and beneficial relationship between Ron and Corvette has been celebrated with the creation of the all-new Corvette Z06, the first ever special edition Corvette to be signed. The stunning Ron Fellows Corvette Z06 is painted an exquisite Arctic White, with two distinctive red racing fender stripes and the signature of Ron Fellows. This fine red and white color scheme is reminiscent of Canada- Fellows’ homeland.

Also noticeable on the exterior of the Corvette Z06 is the racing spoiler, full-width and the windshield banner inscribed with the word “Corvette”. Chrome wheels finish off the unique style. Just as much care has been devoted to the exterior design of the Z06 as its interior. The seats, door panels, center console and instrument panel are red. Its leather armrest is red and marked with the corvette cross flags logo.

Corvette is scheduled to produce only 399 Z06s with only 300 cars headed for the United States. Only 33 cars will be sold in Canada and the remaining 66 cars will be for sale in other countries.

The base price for the Ron Fellows Corvette Z06 is $77,500. If you include the OnStar and navigation options the vehicle price tag comes can exceed $80,000.

Also introduced in 2007 is the Indianapolis 500 Pace Car Replica. This fine Chevrolet Corvette convertible is set to head up the pace on 27 May 2007 at the Indianapolis 500. This Corvette convertible is easily distinguished by its Atomic Orange color with golden graphics. A few of the great cars will be produced as official pace cars with an additional 500 cars manufactured as replicas and made available for the public.

Other exterior features of the replica Convertible Vette Indy sport a Z06 rear spoiler, sterling silver aluminum wheels and Indianapolis 500 fender badges. Its interior appointments will feature ebony seats with the Indianapolis 500 logo and atomic orange trim plate and pods. The price for the replica is set at just under $67 000. The pace cars of this Corvette convertible are kitted with standard safety equipment as well as strobe lights. Ideal for the role as pace car, this Corvette’s engine is pure power and boasts excellent handling for the track. Watch out for this special addition Corvette pace car on the track as well as on the city streets.