Monza Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Monza Speedway has been hosting Formula 1 for decades and its track is Ferrari’s favorite battlefield especially when pitched in front of the typically enthusiastic Italian spectators. The races held on the Monza Speedway are fast. So fast in fact, that a car’s speed can be reduced only when entering the chicanes – used to create a horizontal diversion of traffic (and can be gentler or more restrictive depending on the design).

No circuit currently on the Grand Prix calendar can beat the history, passion and speed of the Monza Speedway. Built in only 100 days, the circuit was opened on August 28, 1922 – making Monza the oldest, and most respected, circuit in use today. The circuit is built in the attractive Royal Park in Monza, a small town just northeast of Milan.

The original track was built as an oval with two long straights and two banked corners, the only part still in use today, is the start/finish straight. Although the rest of the original circuit is not in use, it still lies silently in the forest of Monza. The modernized track is the fastest in the Formula one circuit, with speeds up to 200 miles (320 km). Because of safety regulations the track has been revised more than ten times, especially the Prima Variante, the first chicane, which has been revised more than 20 times.

Because Ferrari sees the Monza Speedway as one of the two home circuits, the crowd are one of the most passionate fans in the world. Ferrari red is the color which is seen the most during the Grand Prix weekend. Work began on the track in 1922 and was completed less than six months later. After Brooklands and Indianapolis – and with a total track length of 10 kilometers – the Monza Speedway became the third permanent race track in existence.

The Monza Speedway is regarded by many as the embodiment of Formula One racing. Not only is it a fantastic example of a track that combines speed with skill, it also has a heart and soul all its own. It has seen some of the finest races of all time, but also some of the sport’s worst accidents. The names of the great drivers and the sounds of engines from years gone by linger in the grand old trees which surround the track in the royal park.

The list of famous victories and horrifying accidents is long, and all combine to make the Monza Speedway one of the most magical places on the Formula One calendar. For many there is nowhere that encapsulates the sport better than this circuit, which the Italians call “La Pista Magica,” or the “magic track.

Monza F1 Grand Prix, has been taking place on the Monza Speedway since 1921. As the largest Italian racing complex and one of the largest in the world, the Monza Speedway is set in the large Parco di Villa Reale. The park, almost 700 hectares, it the largest walled park in Europe and is more than 200 years old! In addition to the speedway, the park contains many other sports facilities such as an Olympic swimming pool, polo club and the Milan Golf Club, with a 27-hole course!

The Monza Speedway includes three tracks: the Gran Premio track, 5,793meters; the Junior track, which can be lit for night races, is 2,405meters; and a speed track with raised curves for setting records and technical testing, of 4,250 meters. The Gran Premio track is one of the fastest on the Formula 1 scene.

Monaco Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Formula One race that takes place on the streets of the Principality of Monaco, is known as the Monaco Grand Prix, or Grand Prix de Monaco. It has long been one of the most important and prestigious racing events on the Formula One calendar, taking place every year since it’s inception in 1929. It has been ranked with the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Indianapolis 500. This magnificent Grand Prix, has always been associated with glamor, fame and riches, and people from all over the world gather in Monaco to watch the race.

The very first Formula One Monaco Grand Prix was organized by Antony Noghes, with the year 1929 predating any other organized World Championship. The organization of the race, was overseen by Prince Louis II, with the assistance of the A.C.M (Automobile Club de Monaco). William Grover-Williams (also known as Williams), won the first event, behind the wheel of a Bugatti. His car was painted green, and would become Britain’s color, referred to as ‘racing green’. Grover-Williams, however, is not related to the later Williams teams, in any way. The Grand Prix was associated with the pre-Second World War European Championships, and it also included the very first Formula One World Championship that took place in 1950. It remained associated with the European Championship during the years 1936 to 1939. As part of the emergency protocol, divers are on hand to rescue any drivers that may have the misfortune of landing in the harbor.

Ayrton Senna, from Brazil, had six Grand Prix victories at the Monaco Grand Prix, of which five were consecutive from the year 1989 to 1993. He was given the title of “Master of Monaco”, but his predecessor, Graham Hill, was known as the “King of Monaco”.

Every year, the streets of Monte Carlo and La Condamine, becomes the jewel of the Grand Prix season. The Formula One Monaco Grand Prix consists of 78 laps, that covers a total of 260.25 kilometers. It takes six weeks to construct the circuit, and it has many tight corners, various elevation changes and is, in general, a very narrow course. Nelson Piquet once said, that even though the course is like trying to ride a bicycle in your living room, one win at the Monaco Grand Prix, is equivalent to winning two races on any other circuit.