Formula One Manufacturers

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

It is quite obvious that vehicle manufacture plays a vital role in the sport of Formula One racing. Certain Manufacturers such as Ferrari and Renault completely manufacture their own Formula One cars. Other teams will form close working relationships with manufacturers. Millions are spent on creating excellent cars, able to handle the road well and reach remarkable speeds. Formula One manufacturers therefore form an integral part of the success and safety of the Formula One drivers who pilot the cars produced. The global motorsport ruling body, Federation Internationale d’Automobile or FIA, introduced a new commission into the world of Formula 1 in 2007. A number of senior position employees from F1 manufacturers were invited to represent their companies on the commission. FIA representatives are Max Mosley, Tony Purnell, Peter Wright and Charlie Whiting.

Whilst Ferrari, Renault and Toyota are “factory” teams, that is, they manufacture their entire F1 car, “independent” teams such as Sauber, Williams and McLaren need to purchase engines. BMW, Honda and Mercedes are popular engine suppliers.

The final touch to the vehicle is the tyres. Two renowned F1 tyre manufacturers are Bridgestone and Michelin. Formula One drivers compete each season for the honorary Drivers’ Championship. However, Formula One car manufacturers are not left out, they can compete for the prestigious Constructors’ Championship. Cars racing for the season are awarded points depending on their finishing position. By the end of the season the points are added up and the Formula One manufacturer with the most points is winner of the Constructors’ Championship.

Manufacturers

Ferrari

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

When we hear the name Ferrari, we immediately picture legendary drivers such as Niki Lauda, John Surtees, Nigel Mansell, Alain Prost, Rubens Barrichello and Michael Schumacher. However, there is more to Ferrari, than a successful racing team. When Enzo Ferrari established Scuderia Ferrari in 1929, he did not do so with road vehicles in mind. He wanted to be part of the racing world and by 1938, Enzo Ferrari headed up the Alfa Romeo racing department. During the war, Alfa Romeo became absorbed by the government in their war efforts, and the little division run by Enzo Ferrari passed by unnoticed. He was not permitted to participate in racing for a period of four years, but he nevertheless built the Tipo 815. In 1943 Enzo Ferrari moved his operations to Maranello, where it still remains today. After the factory was bombed in 1944, it was rebuilt, and included a division for the production of road vehicles, even though this was just to generate the money needed to fund Enzo’s passion for racing. The name Scuderia Ferrari, means Ferrari Stable, but is translated, in a figurative form, to mean Team Ferrari.

The 125S, is the very first road vehicle that Ferrari produced in 1947. Enzo disliked the fact that he was producing vehicles that people bought for prestige and not for how the car performed, but his vehicles continues to grow in popularity, becoming famous for their style, excellence and speed. Today, the rich and the famous ensure that they add a Ferrari to their collection as a status symbol.

The world famous Ferrari emblem has been a source of speculation. All badges have a prancing black horse on a yellow background. The letters SF (Scuderia Ferrari) appear on either side of the horse, with the national colors of Italy (Green, white and red) appearing at the top of the logo.

To know the naming of the Ferrari vehicles, will definitely make you an expert. Until the 1990’s, car engines were named on engine displacement. For example, the V6 and V8 car models were total displacements. That would mean that a 206 would be a 2.0 L V6 and a 348 would be a 3.4 L V8. Displacement is measured in deciliters. On the V12’s displacement is measured in cubic centimeters, of one cylinder, making the 365 Daytona, a 4380ccV12. Flat 12’s were in liters. Body style would also play an integral role in naming a car, and over the years the styles and names have changed, but the excellence and performance has remained top quality.

Working at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, Italy, is the job of dreams. Even though workers are free to wear what they choose, you will not see anything but red. Workstations are decorated in Ferrari logos, racing team memorabilia and everyone works with a smile on their face. There are approximately 30 stations that a car visits before completion, and the production of a Ferrari is not rushed. State of the art machines will ensure a beautiful finish on a paint job, but installations of the custom made seats and dashboards are fitted by hand and installed to perfection. The engine shop produces approximately fifty engines a day, due to its fully automated production line, that employs close to a hundred staff. The automation ensures a decrease in mistakes, and a faster production line. The factory itself is a combination of the old meticulous ways, and the latest technology, incorporated in a relaxing, spacious working environment. The manufacturing of a Ferrari might be faster today, than in Enzo’s day, but the love, pride and the passion that goes into every Ferrari, remains unmatched.

Malaysian Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

The Malaysian Grand Prix has been part of the Formula One World Championship circuit since 1999. It is currently held at the Sepang International Circuit, situated at Sepang near Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia. The circuit is known for its innovative features and for its temperamental climatic changes. The Sepang International Circuit is 5.54 kilometres (3.44 miles) in length, a distance which is lapped 56 times during the course of the race resulting in an overall race length of 310.41 km (192.88 miles). Out of the first eight Malaysian Grand Prix races which have been held on the track, Ferrari has won the most with four wins.

At the track’s inaugural event the scene was set for a spectacular comeback from Michael Schumacher who was returning to the sport after sustaining a broken leg earlier that year. He dominated the race and at the last moment handed the victory to his teammate Eddie Irvine. The crowds went wild and it seemed that the decision was final – that was until both Ferraris were disqualified due to a technical irregularity. Suddenly the winner’s cup was placed in the hands of Mika Hakkinen and Ferrari was out of the picture. The racing world was abuzz with controversy and Ferrari was outraged, until finally the steward’s decision was over-ruled and the cup was returned to Eddie Irvine.

The unpredictable weather patterns of the country often results in additional excitement at the Malaysian Grand Prix. For example, in 2001 a heavy rainstorm suddenly broke out in the middle of the race. Conditions became so bad that both Ferraris in the race spun off at the same corner of the race at almost the same time. Amazingly enough, both recovered to score a first and second in that year’s race. Thus far the Malaysian Grand Prix has been won by Eddie Irvine, Michael Schumacher (3 times), Ralf Schumacher, Kimi Raikkonen, Fernando Alonso and Giancarlo Fisichella. Starting in 2002, the Malaysian Grand Prix was moved from the end of the Grand Prix schedule to the beginning where it continued to play an interesting role in the world of Formula One racing.

Michael Schumacher has clocked up the most wins for the Malaysian Grand Prix, being 2000, 2001 and 2004, with Fernando Alonso taking 2005 and 2007, and Kimi Raikkonen winning in 2003 and 2008. The 2010 Malaysian Grand Prix will take place on 2-4 April, promising once again to provide plenty of excitement for teams and spectators alike.

Formula One Teams

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

The world of Formula One racing consists of a number of F1 teams. These teams are responsible for their own promotion, developing their vehicles, organizing drivers and obtaining sponsorships. Formula One racing fans, if they do not support an individual driver, will root for a particular F1 team. Many of the Formula One teams make a great name for themselves by consistently producing excellent cars and top-standard drivers. This section of Autoracing.com takes a closer look at a number of Formula One’s leading racing teams.

Formula One racing teams typically develop a close working partnership with car manufacturers. Together they work on designing effective, fast and reliable vehicles, set to take drivers to the max. Team managers ensure that everything runs smoothly, from advertising to racing events. F1 racing teams hire several mechanics to keep the Formula One car in top condition. They also work in the pits on racing day, making repairs, changing wheels and adding fuel. F1 drivers may change between teams due to better offers or to pursue greater ambitions. Exceptional Formula 1 drivers have been known to pull flailing teams from the bottom right to victory positions. It is vital however that the entire F1 team work together if they are to do well. From developing strategy right to the finish line on race day, the F1 team makes every effort to boost both car and driver to their highest potential.

Amongst the world’s top-rated F1 teams are Ferrari, Williams, McLaren, Renault and Red Bull. Many drivers dream of attaining a position on these excellent teams. Formula One teams are easily identifiable by their distinctive colors and helmet designs. Who can ignore Ferrari’s bright red outfits and car. Cars, clothing and helmets are emblazoned with the logos of the team’s sponsors. Sponsors are vital to the continuation of a team, as Formula One is an extremely expensive sport. Sponsorship is not difficult for top-ranking teams. Formula One Teams also sell a variety of merchandise from clothing to key-rings and posters. Keep your eyes on the Formula One Grand Prix World Championships to see which F1 team takes the lead this year.

Teams

Ferrari F1 Team

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Scuderia Ferrari is the name of the Ferrari automobile company’s Formula One racing team. Literally translated, the team’s name is Italian for “Ferrari Stable”, but it is more commonly referred to as “Team Ferrari.”

Scuderia Ferrari was first founded in 1929, racing till 1939 for Alfa Romeo. Ferrari’s first attempt at competing in Formula One was in 1950, and through the decades has seen much success. This makes Ferrari one of the oldest, as well as the most successful team racing currently in Formula One. For many years the team has been top of the F1 racing world, holding a host of different records for the drivers’ championships, podium finishes, the most constructors’ championships, wins, points and so on.

Recent years have seen much of the team’s victorious streak being linked to Michael Schumacher. He has been the most dominant competitor and consistent champion in all of the history of F1 racing. Michael Schumacher retired from F1 racing at the end of the 2006 season.

Felipe Massa had a great 2006 season with two wins and finishing third over all, and the Ferrari team signed up Kimi Raikkonen for the 2007 season to replace Schumacher. Ferrari launched a new car, naming it the F2007, and with Kimi Räikkönen behind the wheel, the car crossed the finish line first in the inaugural race of the 2007 season. The Ferrari F1 Team went on to win the 2007 Constructor’s Championship, however controversy involving espionage carried out by a Ferrari employee and a McLaren engineer hung as a dark cloud over the team that year until the matter was resolved.

The 2008 season opened with disappointing results for Ferrari, but things started to look up when Kimi Raikonnin took first place at the Malaysian Grand Prix. The team’s use of a traffic light-type system to signal drivers to leave the pit-stop counted against them when it was triggered too soon resulting in Massa driving off with the fuel pipe still attached at the 2008 Singapore Grand Prix. The 2009 Championships had the worst season start in the team’s history, suffering a further setback when Massa was injured by a part from a competitor’s car which hit him on the helmet and knocked him out while he was traveling at 162 mph. Fortunately, no accident resulted, but his injuries prevented him from competing for the rest of the season, and Ferrari finished in fourth place in the Constructors’ Championship.

The Scuderia Ferrari Marlboro team for 2010 has Felipe Massa and Fernando Alonso as principle drivers, with test and reserve drivers being Giancarlo Fisichella, Luca Badoer and Marc Gené.

« Previous PageNext Page »