Production Vehicles

February 9, 2009 by  
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Production vehicles come in all shapes and sizes, from family cars to off-road vehicles and much, much more. Each production vehicle manufacturer will create a number of models for mass production, thus providing people with a wide choice of vehicles to suit their needs and budgets. The auto production industry is a perfect example of market forces in action – successful vehicles sell in great quantities and for a long time, while models rejected by the market are soon withdrawn. The history of the automibile reflects the changing tastes of the buying public, whose demands are quickly met by the production vehicles designed and produced by automakers worldwide – and competition for consumer dollars is fierce.

In the United States, the main manufacturers of production vehicles are General Motors, Ford and Chrysler (now officially DaimlerChrysler) – traditionally known as ‘The Big Three’. There used to be many more independent automakers, but almost all have gone out of business or have been absorbed by their larger rivals. Some of these bygone makers of American production vehicles were Studebaker, Packard, Hudson, Nash, Willys and Kaiser. A few of these small independent manufacturers joined forces to form American Motors (AMC), but even this wasn’t enough to ensure survival and AMC was bought out by Chrysler in the mid 1970s.

Foreign production vehicles began arriving on American shores after the Second World War. Names like MG, Triumph and Jaguar (England), Volkswagen and Mercedes (Germany), Fiat and Alfa Romeo (Italy) and Renault (France) achieved varying amounts of success here. However, it was the Japanese who have made the biggest impact, and are now the largest foreign-owned manufacturers of production vehicles in the USA. Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Mazda and Subaru are the biggest names and most successful.

Many types of production vehicles are manufactured to directly meet certain automotive needs. Jeep specializes in off-road vehicles that are able to cope with rough terrain and are perfect for adventurous people who want to explore. Porsche and Lamborghini are well known for their powerful and luxurious sports cars. If there’s a recognizable need in the market, you can be sure the automakers will address it with a new production vehicle!

Chevrolet Camaro

February 9, 2009 by  
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Like the AMC Javelin, the Chevrolet Camaro is a popular “pony car” produced by the Chevrolet Motor Division of General Motors. It was introduced in the 1967 model year as competition for the Ford Mustang and was classified as an “intermediate touring car, a muscle car or a sports car”. The Chevrolet Camaro has many similar components to the Pontiac Firebird that was also introduced the same year.

Production of the Camaro stopped in 2002 but not before four distinctive generations of the car were completed. This is not the end of the Camaro as a new one will be set for production in 2009. The name of the Chevrolet was not given with any specific meaning but a GM researcher found the word in a French dictionary and is a slang term for “friend” or “companion”.

The debut Camaro came with over 80 factory and 40 dealer options, including three main packages. One of the packages was the Z/28 that came out for the 1967 model year. This option wasn’t found in any sales literature and was relatively unknown to buyers. It came with many extras that were designed specifically to allow the car to race in the Trans Am series. It was only the 602 Z/28 that was sold in 1967 and 1968, which did not come with a raised cowl induction hood like the 1969 Z/28s.

In 1969 the Camaro came out with a sportier look. The grill had been changed to a heavy “V” cant and had deeply inset headlights. The changes made to the car also gave it a more wider, lower and more aggressive look. That year other changes were also available to the Camaro to increase the competitiveness in the Trans Am racing series.

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was introduced in 1970 and stayed in production for 12 years with the final model produced in 1981. The styling of this generation of Camaro was inspired by Ferrari and due to its size was no longer given a convertible option. The third generation of this car was introduced in 1982, continuing to use the General Motors’ F-body platform. The forth generation Camaro was in production for ten years and from there General Motors has put a stop to the car but a fifth generation car is on the books.

Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS

February 9, 2009 by  
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In 1964, the Chevrolet Chevelle made its debut on the market, as a mid-sized vehicle. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Chevrolet produced the Chevelle, which became one of the General Motors group’s most successful vehicles. It appealed to the public, as this model ranged from an ordinary family vehicle to a powerful, and more expensive convertible or coupe. After 1977, the Malibu name replaced Chevelle, and it was the pride and joy of GM.

The Chevelle was designed as the competitor of the Ford Fairlane, with similar size and similar concept, according to the 1955 to 1957 model vehicles. During the years 1967 to 1972, hardtops with four-doors were available and during 1964 to 1965, consumers could purchase two-door station wagons.

Chevrolet entered into the muscle car ranks with the Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS, and during the years 1964 to 1965, the Malibu badge appeared on the vehicles. The Z16 option is an extremely sought after model, and has the emblem on the front of its fender. The badge reflecting Malibu SS only appeared on models sold in Canada after 1966. The Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS was a high performance vehicle, and therefore, it had its very own line of performance equipment and its own line of engines. Engines that were available were the 325hp, 350hp and 375hp V8 engines. After the COPO dropped their displacement rule in regard to engine power, bigger, more powerful engines were fitted into these muscle cars. The engine ratings began to decline in 1972. The most popular Chevelle of all time was the 454. It could rocket over a quarter mile, reaching speeds of 105 to 108 miles per hour within 13 seconds.

The models that were produced between the year 1973 to 1977 were very popular with the public, although collectors are not interested in them. All models between 1974 and 1977 carried the Malibu name. The SS option was available to all the Malibu coupes, and quite unbelievably, the station wagons. Purchasing a Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS, would include black out trims and bucket seats. In 1978, GM decided to downsize on the intermediate models, which led to the Chevelle name being dropped, and all following models, being named Chevrolet Malibu.

Pontiac Firebird

February 9, 2009 by  
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Mention the Pontiac Firebird to virtually any person and they’ll know that it was one of the most memorable cars ever to roll off the manufacturer’s line – even if they know nothing more about it. The car has defined the lives of so many car lovers and it is truly one of the most spectacular muscle cars ever. The Pontiac Firebird emerged quite unpretentiously halfway through 1967 only to get heads turning and people talking. Before long, the motor industry was abuzz with excitement. The car was produced by the Pontiac Motor Division of General Motors and it was designed and marketed as a pony car – an affordable, compact and stylish sporty car. Were it not for the Ford Mustang and the Mercury Cougar released that same year, the Pontiac Firebird would have completely dominated the scene.

The original model was built on GM’s F-body platform and it had a more likeable rendition of the Pontiac nose. A twin-scoop hood and nice curves further added to its sporty appeal. The Firebird also had a solid, rear axle – a feature which continued to be incorporated into future versions of the car. In 1969, the car had a major facelift. The entire front end was redesigned, making use of an Endura bumper to house the headlights and grilles. Even the instrument panel, steering wheel and ignition switch were changed and updated. For a bit of extra money, buyers could have the Trans Am Performance and Appearance Package which was a little bit more buff than the newly remodelled Firebird and which was named after the Trans-Am Series without permission. In the first year just 697 Trans-Ams were built – only eight of which were convertibles. The Trans-Am cars could be standard or beefed up but they only came in polar white with blue stripes. Today these are highly prized collectors’ cars.

The 1970s Firebird was a completely remodelled version of the classic. This second generation car featured a more sweeping body styling as opposed to the classic ‘coke bottle’ shape. The twin-scoops were made smaller and positioned closer to the front of the bonnet while the double-grille was split further apart and positioned between a single, functional headlight on either side of the car. The remodelling was a complete success and the car enjoyed massive sales. Ironically, the Firebird Trans-Am that emerged at this time were actually more boxy in shape with a protruding Pontiac nose and more angular shapes. Between 1982 and 1992, the third generation of Pontiac Firebirds emerged. The new models were lighter than older cars and incorporated GM’s CCC engine control system. They benefited from improved performance and better fuel economy and had a lower emission rate than previous models. The styling also changed somewhat, with two pop-up lights becoming the most prominent feature on the beautifully restyled front end. By 1984 the unique T-top styling also became a feature.

The fourth and most recent generation of Pontiac Firebird emerged in 1993 and ended in 2002. These beautifully sleek, aerodynamic cars have kept in line with the Firebird tradition of producing fast, stylish and affordable little cars. Truly, not enough can be said about the Firebird’s contribution to the world of muscle cars – but they continue to live on as a most memorable motor vehicle.

Pontiac Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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Produced by the Pontiac division of the General Motors Corporation, the Pontiac Grand Prix was first introduced as a full-size model in 1962. The term ‘Grand Prix’ has also been used to describe personal luxury cars and mid-sized cars. In its first year the car was basically a standard Pontiac Catalina coupe with little external chrome trim and sportier interiors. The cars could be beefed up with any of the options on the Pontiac performance option list and a handful were even fitted with the Super Duty 421 powertrain.

The Pontiac Grand Prix continued to do very well in the 1960s and its minimalist exterior trim was seen as a positive aspect. However, some considered it to be a lesser model than other personal luxury cars available at the time though the Grand Prix had a much stronger performance image than other cars in the same market at the time. Over the years the car was restyled somewhat and the rear window was made concave while the front made use of rather exclusive grillework. The interiors remained luxurious with as many bits and gadgets being fitted as was probably possible. Though the bucket seats that were fitted in the car were popular, consumers had the option of having a bench seat with folding armrests fitted as an alternative if they wanted to at no extra cost.

In 1969, the Grand Prix was once again re-styled. The new styling was based on a slightly longer version of the GM A platform. It was smaller, lighter and had its own body. Though it fell into the intermediate category, it enjoyed a whole new level of luxury and style. This downsizing was incredibly successful and the luxurious interior features a wraparound cockpit-styled instrument panel. It was also the first time that the Grand Prix featured a concealed radio antenna, a rear window defogger and side-impact beams. In 1988 the first Pontiac Grand Prix coupe became a reality. While the sedan version, which had emerged sometime earlier, had not been terribly successful, the coupe was immensely popular. The Pontiac Grand Prix has continued to undergo many interesting developments over the years. As of 2006 the Grand Prix was one of Pontiacs most popular vehicles in production, with 2008 being its last year of production.

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