Riccardo Patrese

February 9, 2009 by  
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Riccardo Patrese of Italy is an outstanding Formula One driver who took part in 256 F1 races. He is known for his extensive career in F1 and scored World Championship points over a longer period of time than any other driver before him. A remarkable Formula One driver, Riccardo Patrese also had a lengthy winning record of eleven seasons between 1982 and 1992. Certainly a name to be remembered, Riccardo Patrese remains a great figure in Formula One racing.

Riccardo Patrese was born on 17 April 1954 in Padua of Italy. From a young age he was an avid sportsman and thoroughly enjoyed racing. As a youngster he would spend the summer months go-karting. He won several karting championships. Following his 1974 Karting Championship win, Patrese was offered a position in Formula Italia by Nettuno Racing. His career in racing advanced from there into Formula 3 as of April 1976. He quickly moved to Formula 2 and debuted as a Formula One Driver in May 1977. Riccardo Patrese began his F1 racing career with the Shado Grand Prix team. At his first race in Monaco he came in at 9th place, impressing all. By the end of the year he gained his first ever World Championship point.

Certain members of the Shadow team decided to break-away and form the Arrows team. Patrese went with them. The Arrows along with Patrese debuted at Silverstone in 1978. The new team quickly established itself at the South African Grand Prix where Patrese led for about 36 laps before car trouble struck. Many criticized Riccardo Patrese’s arrogant and aggressive driving style. Patrese was blamed for the death of F1 driver Ronnie Peterson in the 1978 race at Monza. Riccardo Patrese and Gianni Restelli were later charged with manslaughter, however, he was later cleared of blame.

In the year 1982 Riccardo Patrese began racing for the Brabham team. That year he met with great success and a marvelous win. He later changed to the Alfa Romeo team between 1984 and 1985 and then back to Brabham between 1986 and 1987. Then in 1988 Patrese went to Williams. Riccardo Patrese gained victory once again in San Marino Grand Prix in 1990. Once again 1991 saw numerous successes for Patrese. Riccardo Patrese ended his career in F1 Grand Prix racing for Bennetton alongside Michael Schumacher in 1993.

Ferrari

February 9, 2009 by  
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When we hear the name Ferrari, we immediately picture legendary drivers such as Niki Lauda, John Surtees, Nigel Mansell, Alain Prost, Rubens Barrichello and Michael Schumacher. However, there is more to Ferrari, than a successful racing team. When Enzo Ferrari established Scuderia Ferrari in 1929, he did not do so with road vehicles in mind. He wanted to be part of the racing world and by 1938, Enzo Ferrari headed up the Alfa Romeo racing department. During the war, Alfa Romeo became absorbed by the government in their war efforts, and the little division run by Enzo Ferrari passed by unnoticed. He was not permitted to participate in racing for a period of four years, but he nevertheless built the Tipo 815. In 1943 Enzo Ferrari moved his operations to Maranello, where it still remains today. After the factory was bombed in 1944, it was rebuilt, and included a division for the production of road vehicles, even though this was just to generate the money needed to fund Enzo’s passion for racing. The name Scuderia Ferrari, means Ferrari Stable, but is translated, in a figurative form, to mean Team Ferrari.

The 125S, is the very first road vehicle that Ferrari produced in 1947. Enzo disliked the fact that he was producing vehicles that people bought for prestige and not for how the car performed, but his vehicles continues to grow in popularity, becoming famous for their style, excellence and speed. Today, the rich and the famous ensure that they add a Ferrari to their collection as a status symbol.

The world famous Ferrari emblem has been a source of speculation. All badges have a prancing black horse on a yellow background. The letters SF (Scuderia Ferrari) appear on either side of the horse, with the national colors of Italy (Green, white and red) appearing at the top of the logo.

To know the naming of the Ferrari vehicles, will definitely make you an expert. Until the 1990’s, car engines were named on engine displacement. For example, the V6 and V8 car models were total displacements. That would mean that a 206 would be a 2.0 L V6 and a 348 would be a 3.4 L V8. Displacement is measured in deciliters. On the V12’s displacement is measured in cubic centimeters, of one cylinder, making the 365 Daytona, a 4380ccV12. Flat 12’s were in liters. Body style would also play an integral role in naming a car, and over the years the styles and names have changed, but the excellence and performance has remained top quality.

Working at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, Italy, is the job of dreams. Even though workers are free to wear what they choose, you will not see anything but red. Workstations are decorated in Ferrari logos, racing team memorabilia and everyone works with a smile on their face. There are approximately 30 stations that a car visits before completion, and the production of a Ferrari is not rushed. State of the art machines will ensure a beautiful finish on a paint job, but installations of the custom made seats and dashboards are fitted by hand and installed to perfection. The engine shop produces approximately fifty engines a day, due to its fully automated production line, that employs close to a hundred staff. The automation ensures a decrease in mistakes, and a faster production line. The factory itself is a combination of the old meticulous ways, and the latest technology, incorporated in a relaxing, spacious working environment. The manufacturing of a Ferrari might be faster today, than in Enzo’s day, but the love, pride and the passion that goes into every Ferrari, remains unmatched.

San Marino Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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The San Marino Grand Prix forms a part of the Formula One Championship calendar each year. It has been held at the Autodromo e Dino Ferrari of Imola, Italy for several years, and as there was already an Italian Grand Prix when it was established, it was named the San Marino Grand Prix. A number of thrilling races have been recorded during the San Marino Grand Prix, which draws large numbers of Formula One fans each year.

Imola proves to be the perfect setting for Formula One racing. For decades it has been surrounded by numerous racing car manufacturers such as Maserati, Ferrari and Lamborghini. San Marino hosted its first car race in 1954, and several years later, in 1963, San Marino held a race with F1 cars. This non-championship race was won by Lotus’ Jim Clark and set a precedent for things to come. By the year 1980, the Italian Grand Prix was transferred to Imola from Monza after an awful startline pile-up in 1978. This amazing Formula One race was won by Nelson Piquet. The Italian Grand Prix moved back to Monza in 1981, with Imola creating its own race, namely the San Marino Grand Prix.

Unfortunately, the history of the San Marino Grand Prix was marked by 3 large accidents in 1994. That year was sadly marred by the death of F1 legend Ayrton Senna as well as great driver Roland Ratzenberger. However, there have been many exciting events at the San Marino Grand Prix. One of the most notable was the duel between Didier Pironi and Gilles Villeneuve in 1982.

The San Marino Grand Prix runs for 62 laps around the 4.93 km circuit of Autodomo e Dino Ferrari. Thus the race totals 305.61 km. Michael Schumacher has won the San Marino Grand Prix in the following years: 2006, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2000,1999 and 1994. Fernando Alonso gained victory in 2005 and Ralf Schumacher took the lead in 2001.

Unfortunately, the facilities at Imola deteriorated to the point that the San Marino Grand Prix was excluded from the 2007 calendar and has not featured since.

Imola

February 9, 2009 by  
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Imola is a picturesque little town in the province of Bologna which can be found on the Santerno river in north-central Italy. For much of the year this ancient Roman settlement enjoys a charming tranquillity that lends itself to romantic getaways and leisurely holidays. Imola is best known for two things – it is the home of the Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari and the San Marino Grand Prix. It also unfortunately known as the track where the legendary Ayrton Senna lost his life in 1994. Rubens Barrichello was also badly injured in that very same race.

The Formula One San Marino Grand Prix is named for the nearby independent republic of San Marino but it is held in Imola. The track as Imola was used for the 51st Italian Grand Prix in 1980 and became a regular home for the San Marino Grand Prix shortly afterwards. This Formula One championship race has been run at the Autodrome Enzo e Dino Ferrari in Imola since 1981. It was named for San Marino as there was already an Italian Grand Prix at the time. Since San Marino is too small to host a grand prix, the decision was made to use the track at Imola and name the Grand Prix after the republic.

Motoring enthusiasts are usually pleased to learn that the area surrounding Imola is home to a number of racing car manufacturers such as Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati. What’s more, a number of local roads have been linked together to form a test track for these manufacturers. This means that bystanders are often given the opportunity to see new and improved models in action as they are being tested on the public roads. Imola has a strong racing legacy and cars have been zipping around the area since 1954.

The first non-championship event with Formula One cars to be held here took place in 1963. However the racetrack at Imola really came into its own when, in 1980, the Italian Grand Prix was temporarily moved to Imola from Monza after a massive and tragic start line pile-up. The following year the Italian Grand Prix was moved back to Monza and the decision was made to launch the track in Imola as the San Marino Grand Prix. Though the track has been incredibly popular during the course of it’s racing career, recent accidents and deaths have brought up complaints of unsafe road-surfaces and other scruples. As a result the San Marino Grand Prix may soon end a long and successful period as a brilliant Formula One Grand Prix host.

The 2010 Italian Grand Prix will be held at Monza.

Mugello Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Located in the beautiful Tuscany region of Italy, with its 5.245 mile track and a total variance in altitude of 41,19 meters, the Mugello Moto GP Circuit presents car and bike manufacturers with ideal conditions for rigorous testing and is regularly used by Ferrari for putting its F1 cars through their paces during development. So although Mugello is not a venue for an FIA Formula One World Championship race event, it is nonetheless closely linked with this exciting sport.

With a history going back to 1914, when the first race was held on a road circuit, Mugello has hosted some legendary drivers and seen the development of innovative racing cars through the decades. The World Wars interrupted events at Mugello, but during the sixties, large crowds of spectators were drawn by the excitement on the track as auto racing started to develop, going from strength to strength.

Today, Mugello Moto GP Circuit boasts up-to-date facilities and hosts a variety of events, as well as being the testing ground for some of the world’s most technologically advanced racing cars.

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