Australian Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

The Formula One Australian Grand Prix is currently held at Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit located in Melbourne’s Albert Park. In the past the races hosted open wheel racing, in the Formula One style, but they were not part of the World Championships. Venues also alternated a great deal, with Albert Park, being very popular in the 1950s. Local drivers would often compete against the world class drivers of the time., but this form of racing came to an end in 1984.

In 1985, the Australian Grand Prix became a part of the World Championships, and therefore, a part of Formula One racing. The last race of the season was raced on the Adelaide street circuit. This street circuit was not as narrow and challenging as the circuit in Monaco, but nevertheless proved to be quite a challenge for drivers and their cars. In 1986, one of the most memorable Australian Grand Prix took place here. At that time,Nigel Mansell only needed a third place to win the championship. Also fighting for the much coveted title was Alain Prost and Nelson Piquet. With Mansell in the lead and only a few laps to the finish, everyone thought that they knew the outcome. The Williams car that Mansell was driving, suddenly had a mechanical failure, sending Mansell with sparks flying, off the circuit. Prost, then took the lead, to win the race and the championship. He too, almost did not make it, as he ran out of fuel on his warm down lap.

In 1995, the Adelaide Street Circuit held its last Formula One Australian Grand Prix, to the disappointment of many. This was a very popular street circuit amongst the drivers, and the teams thoroughly enjoyed the circuit’s atmosphere. In 1993, together with the Australian Grand Prix chairman Ron Walker, politician and premier of Victoria, Jeff Kennett, announced that the Formula 1 Australian Grand Prix would be moved to Albert Park. A significant amount of money was spent to rebuild the circuit, and it led to protests and controversy. Many people believed that the funds would have been better spent by erecting a permanent circuit, rather than using a street circuit, and that the benefits outlined to support the Albert Park renovations, were exaggerated and not completely true. Although a permanent circuit has never been seriously considered, the Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit still attracts plenty of spectators. The Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit is completed in 58 laps and is a total race length of 307.57 kilometers.

Albert Park

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Situated in the City of Port Phillip in Victoria, Australia, Albert Park and Lake lie roughly 3 kilometres south of the Melbourne CBD. Set in 555 acres of stunning parkland, the Albert Park incorporates a number of sporting facilities, ovals, a golf course, a walking track and the Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit.

Besides hosting a number of premier racing events, the park and Gunn Island provide a great habitat for a number of bird species, bats, possums, reptiles and amphibians. You’ll also find the Bob Jane Football stadium and the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre at Albert Park while the lake is used to host regular regattas.

Every year the Australian Grand Prix is held at the Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, a street-based circuit that snakes its way around the Albert Park Lake. It is this spectacular event for which the Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit is best known and the race usually takes place on the Labour Day weekend. Though the race takes place on a number of everyday sections of road, these sections were rebuilt prior to the inaugural race in 1996 so they are quite smooth when compared to other public road circuits. Add to this the picturesque setting of Albert Park, and the racetrack is an unbeatable location for Formula One racing. What’s more, the Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit at Albert Park is one of the few places on the Formula 1 calendar which are situated near a body of water.

Drivers generally find that the track is fast and easy to drive and learn. However, it does not make overtaking easy and spectators generally have to have a grandstand seat in order to enjoy the race. As early as four weeks before the major event, the majority of the trackside fencing, pedestrian overpasses and grandstands are put up in preparation. All of this is generally removed again in the two weeks following the event. Though a small number of people find the limited access to the various park facilities during this time to be an inconvenience, the majority of the public enjoy the race and venture out to see it each year.