Italian F1 Grand Prix 2013

July 11, 2013 by  
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Taking place on Sunday, September 8, at the Autodromo di Monza the Italian F1 Grand Prix consists of 53 laps covering a distance of 306.720 kilometers. The current record of 1:21.046 was set by Rubens Barrichello in 2004. For more information visit formula1.com

Date: 8 September 2013
Venue: Autodromo di Monza
Country: Italy

Formula 1 Italian Grand Prix 2012

August 8, 2012 by  
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Taking place at the Monza Speedway, the race covers 53 laps of the 5.793 kilometer track. The track lap record of 1:21.046 was set by R Barrichello in 2004. For more information visit www.formula1.com

Date: 9 September 2012
Venue: Monza Speedway
Country: Italy

2011 F1 Italian Grand Prix

August 8, 2011 by  
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F1 fans are eagerly awaiting the 2011 Italian Grand Prix event. Taking place at Autodromo di Monza, the event consists of 53 laps around a circuit of 5.793 km, with a total race distance of 306.720 km. The lap record for this grand prix is 1:21.046, set by R Barrichello in 2004.

Dates: 9 to 11 September 2011
Venue: Autodromo di Monza
City: Monza
Country: Italy

Monza Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Monza Speedway has been hosting Formula 1 for decades and its track is Ferrari’s favorite battlefield especially when pitched in front of the typically enthusiastic Italian spectators. The races held on the Monza Speedway are fast. So fast in fact, that a car’s speed can be reduced only when entering the chicanes – used to create a horizontal diversion of traffic (and can be gentler or more restrictive depending on the design).

No circuit currently on the Grand Prix calendar can beat the history, passion and speed of the Monza Speedway. Built in only 100 days, the circuit was opened on August 28, 1922 – making Monza the oldest, and most respected, circuit in use today. The circuit is built in the attractive Royal Park in Monza, a small town just northeast of Milan.

The original track was built as an oval with two long straights and two banked corners, the only part still in use today, is the start/finish straight. Although the rest of the original circuit is not in use, it still lies silently in the forest of Monza. The modernized track is the fastest in the Formula one circuit, with speeds up to 200 miles (320 km). Because of safety regulations the track has been revised more than ten times, especially the Prima Variante, the first chicane, which has been revised more than 20 times.

Because Ferrari sees the Monza Speedway as one of the two home circuits, the crowd are one of the most passionate fans in the world. Ferrari red is the color which is seen the most during the Grand Prix weekend. Work began on the track in 1922 and was completed less than six months later. After Brooklands and Indianapolis – and with a total track length of 10 kilometers – the Monza Speedway became the third permanent race track in existence.

The Monza Speedway is regarded by many as the embodiment of Formula One racing. Not only is it a fantastic example of a track that combines speed with skill, it also has a heart and soul all its own. It has seen some of the finest races of all time, but also some of the sport’s worst accidents. The names of the great drivers and the sounds of engines from years gone by linger in the grand old trees which surround the track in the royal park.

The list of famous victories and horrifying accidents is long, and all combine to make the Monza Speedway one of the most magical places on the Formula One calendar. For many there is nowhere that encapsulates the sport better than this circuit, which the Italians call “La Pista Magica,” or the “magic track.

Monza F1 Grand Prix, has been taking place on the Monza Speedway since 1921. As the largest Italian racing complex and one of the largest in the world, the Monza Speedway is set in the large Parco di Villa Reale. The park, almost 700 hectares, it the largest walled park in Europe and is more than 200 years old! In addition to the speedway, the park contains many other sports facilities such as an Olympic swimming pool, polo club and the Milan Golf Club, with a 27-hole course!

The Monza Speedway includes three tracks: the Gran Premio track, 5,793meters; the Junior track, which can be lit for night races, is 2,405meters; and a speed track with raised curves for setting records and technical testing, of 4,250 meters. The Gran Premio track is one of the fastest on the Formula 1 scene.

Juan Manuel Fangio

February 9, 2009 by  
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Juan Manuel Fangio, also known as “The Maestro”, a legendary race car driver. Master of Formula One when it first began, Fangio was a 5-time World Champion. His record of wins was only recently defeated by Michael Schumacher who himself said that he could never be greater than Juan Manuel Fangio.

Juan Manuel Fangio was born in Argentina on 24 June 1911. His parents were originally from Italy. Fangio’s grand racing career began in 1934. He chiefly took part in long-distance races on the dirt roads of South America. Fangio won the Gran Premio del Norte of 1940, a race that takes some 2 weeks and covers a distance of 10 000 km. Following World War Two, Fangio began racing in Europe. Although one of the oldest drivers around, Juan Manuel Fangio quickly caught the eye of spectators. Fangio’s success truly came when he began racing with Alfa Romeo in 1950, winning his first championship title in 1951. In 1952 he was racing for Maserati when he sustained a neck injury in an accident at Monza. The next year he continued with Maserati, coming in second for the season. Fangio moved to Mercedes in 1954. He once again took home the World Championship title. Mercedes later discontinued participating in racing after the Le Mans disaster of 1955.

Juan Manuel Fangio went on to race for Ferrai in 1956 and won his fourth title. Maserati once regained Fangio in 1957. He again cruised to victory, winning his fifth title. Very few will forget his remarkable performance at Nurburgring of Germany. Fangio drove his last race in 1958, the French Grand Prix. An amazing driver many believe that no one will ever meet Fangio’s record for wins against starts.

Following his retirement as an F1 driver, Juan Manuel Fangio became a representative of Mercedes-Benz. He became an International Motor Sports Hall of Fame inductee in 1990. In 1995 Juan Manuel Fangio died at a grand age of 84 and is now buried in the Balcarce cemetery in Argentina. The tale of Fangio is one that will continue to be told for many generations to come and Formula One fans will never forget Fangio, the racing legend.

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