Superbikes – Electric VS Gasoline

December 10, 2010 by  
Filed under Features

Finding more fuel efficient modes of transport has been at the top of the priority list for most manufacturers, who have been designing and building electric vehicles, and discovering new ways to power cars, so that their design is environmentally friendly. But it is not only cars that have seen innovative technology come their way, as electric superbikes have also been strutting their stuff on the racetrack. However, gasoline powered superbikes have never come up against electric superbikes and, as the latest electric superbike is too heavy to compete against other electric superbikes, it will be making history next year.

The new electric superbike, design and created by the American company Swigz Racing, will be put to the test on the track this year. It will be preparing to face-off against gasoline powered superbikes at the Auto Club Speedway (California) in a specially organized race, on 9 January 2011.

“We have to thank WERA Motorcycle Roadracing for inviting us into their series to make history with this news. Our electric motorcycle will compete head on with real racing superbikes such as the Ducati 1198 and KTM RC8 as well as other established manufacturers, and we expect to work hard to show the world that electric technology can achieve laptime parity with gasoline superbikes. We’re not going on track to make up the numbers; we’re going out to compete in order to raise our game and catch up to these gasoline guys,” said owner of Swigz Racing, Chip Yates, who is also the rider of the new superbike. The 194 hp and 400Nm superbike does not qualify to participate in electric superbike events, as the new rules for the TTGP Championship and FIM Championship now stipulate that the bikes need to weigh in at a maximum of 250 kilograms, whereas the new electric superbike weighs 266 kilograms.

Yates is not concerned about the exclusion, as his new bike has outdone the 600 cc superbikes in the power to weight ratio features, and even though its technology has made the bike heavier than competing electric superbikes, there is the WERA Pirelli Sportsman Heavyweight Twins Superbike class to look forward to. Permitting the new electric superbike to compete against standard gasoline superbikes, will allow manufacturers to continue developing and promoting the electric superbike, and most importantly, show the world what an electric superbike can do.

Grand Prix Motorcycle Racing

August 18, 2010 by  
Filed under Features

With history going back to its first FIM organized event in 1949, Grand Prix motorcycle racing is an international series which has gathered a loyal following of fans who turn out in droves to watch driver and machine become as one as they compete for the checkered flag. As the main championship of motorcycle road racing, the Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix is divided into three categories: 125cc, Moto2, and MotoGP. Setting the Grand Prix series apart from other motorcycle racing series, such as the Superbike World Championship, is the fact that the motorcycles competing in the Grand Prix are built specifically for racing and therefore cannot be bought at a dealership and are not licensed to ride on public roads.

The MotoGP series consists of eighteen races, held in fourteen countries, on four continents, with global television coverage ensuring that fans all over the world can share in the excitement. Currently seven nationalities are represented among the riders who line the starting grid, with four manufacturers – Ducati, Honda, Yamaha and Suzuki – providing the latest in motorcycle technology.

Now in its 62nd year, MotoGP is not only the premier motorcycle racing world championship, but it is also the longest running championship series. Under the supervision of the FIM, the series is managed by Dorna Sports and has been since 1992. With more than 2.2 million people attending races in 2009, there is no doubt that spectators appreciate the effort put into the organization of each of the eighteen events, which feature races in each of the three categories.

The 125cc category is the stepping stone into this exciting sport. The minimum age for riders is 15 years, with the maximum set at 28 years – the exception being for wild-card riders, or riders who are newly contracted and competing in a 125 cc event for the first time, where the minimum age will be 25 years. Maximum engine displacement in this category is 125cc single-cylinder units. As announced in December 2008, from 2010 the 250cc category has been replaced by Moto2 – a 4-stroke class aimed at being a cost-effective, but prestigious, class to accompany the star of the show, the MotoGP.

Recognized as the ultimate test for motorcycle racing’s finest talents, MotoGP allows a maximum engine capacity of 800cc (4-stroke engines) and the motorcycle must be a prototype. The minimum age for riders competing in the MotoGP class is 18 years. Fiat Yamaha rider Valentino Rossi is the current MotoGP World Champion, having claimed his seventh premier class title in 2009.

Classics for Charity 2009

November 11, 2009 by  
Filed under events

Vintage car and motorcycle enthusiasts will be showing off their prized possessions on 14 November 2009, at Fat Willy’s Family Sports Grill, in aid of charity. Hosted by the Mahnah Club, there will be twenty judging classes for entrants, and a host of cars, motorcycles and trucks for the public to marvel at. There will also be a pre-party at the sports grill; offering music, raffles and food, to kick start the event on 13 November 2009.

For additional information in regard to this magnificent event, visit the Mahnah Club website at http://www.mahnahclub.org/car-auction-az-fund-raising-event.htm.

Date: 14 November 2009
Venue: Fat Willy’s Family Sports Grill
City: Mesa, Arizona
Country: United Stated of America

Valencia MotoGP

July 17, 2009 by  
Filed under events

For unchallenged and thrilling motorcycle action, racing enthusiast are recommended to get down to Valencia from the 6th to the 8th of November 2009, where the Valencia MotoGP will be taking place at Circuito De Valencia. Spectators are advised to purchase their tickets ahead of time, as ticket sales are on sale at present, and with more than a hundred and fifty thousand spectators attending this event, ticket will sell out fast.

The Valencia MotoGP is a wonderful event that is attended by many international and Spanish riders, as it is known for its festive and celebratory atmosphere.

Date: 6 – 8 November 2009
Venue: Circuito De Valencia
City: Valencia
Country: Spain

Swede Savage

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

David Earl Savage Jr, was born in San Bernardino, in California, on 26 August 1946. He was an all American NASCAR driver that started his career in Soap Box Derbies at the tender age of five years old. Soon he was racing Quarter Midget cars, and by the age of twelve, he had moved up to Go-Kart racing. Swede Savage took a keen interest in motorcycle racing in his late teens, and started driving a Lola in the late 1960s, in the Can-Am Racing Series. A few NASCAR drivers and events saw the introduction of this talented driver during the years 1968 and 1969. Swede Savage was forced out of the Daytona 500 in 1969, after his car’s wheel fell of on the 124th lap, and he crashed out. The undeterred Savage was driving an identical sponsored Plymouth Barracudas as his teammate Dan Gurney in the 1970 Trans-Am Series.

Swede Savage took home the “Phoenix Bobby Ball 150” title in 1970, behind the wheel of an Indycar. He also raced in the Indianapolis 500 twice, with a 32nd place finish in 1972, after being forced to drop out of the race due to mechanical problems. In 1973, Swede Savage lead the Indianapolis 500 for a total of twelve laps, but was unfortunately passed on the 55th lap, by Al Unser. It was on the 58th lap, that tragedy struck. Savage’s car had brushed along side the wall at the turn four exit and his car went sliding across the track sideways. Swede Savage then impacted violently, at a very oblique angle, against the track wall. The car disintegrated on impact and erupted in a ball of flames, with the trans axle and engine tumbling continuously until it reached the entrance to the pit lane. Swede Savage was still strapped in his racing seat, and the force had thrown him across the circuit, where on this hand and knees, he came to rest at the outer retaining wall. He was completely exposed. The tragedy did not end there. Crewmembers, Armando Teran and Graham McRae, ran blindly to their injured driver. Their concern and worry for his condition caused them not to see the fire truck that was approaching the scene, driving in the opposite direction of pit lane travel, that struck and killed Armando Teran. Teran was one of the youngest members of the team.

Thirty three days after his horrific accident, David Earl “Swede” Savage, died from his injuries. Savage had inhaled racing fuel vapors during his ordeal, that had led to severe respiratory failure. Swede Savage was laid to rest in Mt View Cemetery in San Bernardino, and left behind a wife, a six year old daughter and an unborn baby. The loss of this wonderful driver, and the tragedy that befell his family, friends and fans, is evident in the fan sites and kind words that are still expressed today.

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