Superbikes – Electric VS Gasoline

December 10, 2010 by  
Filed under Features

Finding more fuel efficient modes of transport has been at the top of the priority list for most manufacturers, who have been designing and building electric vehicles, and discovering new ways to power cars, so that their design is environmentally friendly. But it is not only cars that have seen innovative technology come their way, as electric superbikes have also been strutting their stuff on the racetrack. However, gasoline powered superbikes have never come up against electric superbikes and, as the latest electric superbike is too heavy to compete against other electric superbikes, it will be making history next year.

The new electric superbike, design and created by the American company Swigz Racing, will be put to the test on the track this year. It will be preparing to face-off against gasoline powered superbikes at the Auto Club Speedway (California) in a specially organized race, on 9 January 2011.

“We have to thank WERA Motorcycle Roadracing for inviting us into their series to make history with this news. Our electric motorcycle will compete head on with real racing superbikes such as the Ducati 1198 and KTM RC8 as well as other established manufacturers, and we expect to work hard to show the world that electric technology can achieve laptime parity with gasoline superbikes. We’re not going on track to make up the numbers; we’re going out to compete in order to raise our game and catch up to these gasoline guys,” said owner of Swigz Racing, Chip Yates, who is also the rider of the new superbike. The 194 hp and 400Nm superbike does not qualify to participate in electric superbike events, as the new rules for the TTGP Championship and FIM Championship now stipulate that the bikes need to weigh in at a maximum of 250 kilograms, whereas the new electric superbike weighs 266 kilograms.

Yates is not concerned about the exclusion, as his new bike has outdone the 600 cc superbikes in the power to weight ratio features, and even though its technology has made the bike heavier than competing electric superbikes, there is the WERA Pirelli Sportsman Heavyweight Twins Superbike class to look forward to. Permitting the new electric superbike to compete against standard gasoline superbikes, will allow manufacturers to continue developing and promoting the electric superbike, and most importantly, show the world what an electric superbike can do.

Grand Prix Motorcycle Racing

August 18, 2010 by  
Filed under Features

With history going back to its first FIM organized event in 1949, Grand Prix motorcycle racing is an international series which has gathered a loyal following of fans who turn out in droves to watch driver and machine become as one as they compete for the checkered flag. As the main championship of motorcycle road racing, the Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix is divided into three categories: 125cc, Moto2, and MotoGP. Setting the Grand Prix series apart from other motorcycle racing series, such as the Superbike World Championship, is the fact that the motorcycles competing in the Grand Prix are built specifically for racing and therefore cannot be bought at a dealership and are not licensed to ride on public roads.

The MotoGP series consists of eighteen races, held in fourteen countries, on four continents, with global television coverage ensuring that fans all over the world can share in the excitement. Currently seven nationalities are represented among the riders who line the starting grid, with four manufacturers – Ducati, Honda, Yamaha and Suzuki – providing the latest in motorcycle technology.

Now in its 62nd year, MotoGP is not only the premier motorcycle racing world championship, but it is also the longest running championship series. Under the supervision of the FIM, the series is managed by Dorna Sports and has been since 1992. With more than 2.2 million people attending races in 2009, there is no doubt that spectators appreciate the effort put into the organization of each of the eighteen events, which feature races in each of the three categories.

The 125cc category is the stepping stone into this exciting sport. The minimum age for riders is 15 years, with the maximum set at 28 years – the exception being for wild-card riders, or riders who are newly contracted and competing in a 125 cc event for the first time, where the minimum age will be 25 years. Maximum engine displacement in this category is 125cc single-cylinder units. As announced in December 2008, from 2010 the 250cc category has been replaced by Moto2 – a 4-stroke class aimed at being a cost-effective, but prestigious, class to accompany the star of the show, the MotoGP.

Recognized as the ultimate test for motorcycle racing’s finest talents, MotoGP allows a maximum engine capacity of 800cc (4-stroke engines) and the motorcycle must be a prototype. The minimum age for riders competing in the MotoGP class is 18 years. Fiat Yamaha rider Valentino Rossi is the current MotoGP World Champion, having claimed his seventh premier class title in 2009.

Classics for Charity 2009

November 11, 2009 by  
Filed under events

Vintage car and motorcycle enthusiasts will be showing off their prized possessions on 14 November 2009, at Fat Willy’s Family Sports Grill, in aid of charity. Hosted by the Mahnah Club, there will be twenty judging classes for entrants, and a host of cars, motorcycles and trucks for the public to marvel at. There will also be a pre-party at the sports grill; offering music, raffles and food, to kick start the event on 13 November 2009.

For additional information in regard to this magnificent event, visit the Mahnah Club website at http://www.mahnahclub.org/car-auction-az-fund-raising-event.htm.

Date: 14 November 2009
Venue: Fat Willy’s Family Sports Grill
City: Mesa, Arizona
Country: United Stated of America

Valencia MotoGP

July 17, 2009 by  
Filed under events

For unchallenged and thrilling motorcycle action, racing enthusiast are recommended to get down to Valencia from the 6th to the 8th of November 2009, where the Valencia MotoGP will be taking place at Circuito De Valencia. Spectators are advised to purchase their tickets ahead of time, as ticket sales are on sale at present, and with more than a hundred and fifty thousand spectators attending this event, ticket will sell out fast.

The Valencia MotoGP is a wonderful event that is attended by many international and Spanish riders, as it is known for its festive and celebratory atmosphere.

Date: 6 – 8 November 2009
Venue: Circuito De Valencia
City: Valencia
Country: Spain

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Welcome to America’s speedway! The Indianapolis Motor Speedway was built on 328 acres of farmland 7 miles north-west of downtown Indianapolis in the spring of 1909. It didn’t start out as one of the most famous racetracks in the world. It was planned as a year-round testing facility for the fast-growing automobile industry in Indiana. Occasional race meets would be presented at the track, featuring those very same manufacturers racing their products against each other. The basic marketing logic being that spectators would be more apt to purchase a new car if they saw its performance on a race-track.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway was originally four turns, each banked at nine degrees and 12 minutes and measuring exactly 440 yards from entrance to exit, were linked together by a pair of long straights and, at the north and south ends of the property, by a pair of short straights to form a rectangular-shaped 2 ½ mile track as dictated by the confines of the available land.

Check out these track statistics:

Road Course: total track length: 2.605 miles (4.192 kilometers)
Main straight length: 3,037 feet (926 meters)
Back straight length: 1,755 feet (535 meters)
Total turns: 13 (Left turns – 4; Right turns – 9)
Average track width: 46 feet (14 meters)
Expected Lap Time: 72 seconds
Expected average speed: 130 mph (210 kph)
Expected highest speed: 187 mph (301 kph)
Race Distance: 190.294 miles (306.235 km), 73 laps
Time limit on Race: FIA rules stipulate that Formula 1 races have a maximum time limit of two hours. This race should be completed in less than two hours, barring an emergency stoppage.

The original surface of Indianapolis Motor Speedway was made of nothing but crushed rock and tar, which proved to be disastrous at the opening motorcycle and automobile racing events in August of 1909. So a staggering 3,200,000 paving bricks were imported by rail from the western part of the state. They were laid on their sides in a bed of sand and fixed with mortar, thus inspiring the nickname “The Brickyard.” The name has stood forever more.

Asphalt was first applied to the rougher portions of the track in 1936, and by 1941, all but the greater part of the straightaway had become blacktop. The remainder of the bricks were finally covered over in the fall of 1961. Most of the original paving bricks are still in place underneath the modern asphalt surface, with only the famous “yard of bricks” still exposed at the start/finish line as a nostalgic reminder of the past.

The track has changed ownership only twice. With Carl Fisher heavily involved in the development of Miami Beach and Jim Allison’s nearby engineering company growing rapidly, the foursome sold Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1927 to a group headed up by WWI flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker (Rickenbacker had actually driven in several Indy 500s before he ever knew how to fly).

These days the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, opened in 1909, is the world’s largest spectator facility and the only racetrack to host the Indy Racing League, NASCAR and Formula One. Since 1911, the Speedway has been the home of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” the Indianapolis 500 each May. The Allstate 400 at the Brickyard (formerly Brickyard 400) has quickly become one of NASCAR’s most coveted races since the inaugural event in 1994 and heats up the track in late July. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway completed the Triple Crown of Racing in 2000 with the addition of June’s United States Grand Prix, the only Formula One race run in the United States.

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