Cape Classic Car Show 2009

October 23, 2009 by  
Filed under events

The Cape Classic Car Show 2009, will be hosted by the Cape Multi Motor Club at the Northerns Rugby Club on 15 November 2009. With almost a thousand cars to marvel at, visitors to the show will be in for a real classic car treat. In addition, there will be racing cars, motorcycles, stock cars and street rods on display.

The show starts at 10 am and closes at 4 pm. For more information in regard to registry, ticket prices or the show in general, visit the site at or email to

Date: 15 November 2009
Venue: Northerns Rugby Club
City: Cape Town, Western Cape
Country: South Africa

Whales n Wheels 2009

September 11, 2009 by  
Filed under events

Hermanus is usually a destination known for whale watching, but on 26 September 2009, all eyes will be on the gleaming vehicles at the Whales n Wheels 2009. As a part of the Hermanus Whale Festival, this spectacular auto show brings the past to life with over two hundred and ninety vintage vehicles, veteran tractors and motorcycles from a bygone era. Car dealerships will also have some of their latest contributions to the motoring industry on display, allowing those in attendance to take a walk from the 1920’s into the present.

More information in regard to the show and the line up for the day, is available of the shows’ website at

Date: 26 September 2009
Venue: Hermanus Primary School
City: Hermanus
Country: South Africa

Jackie Stewart

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Jackie Stewart aka The Flying Scot is a renowned Formula One driver from the ’60s and ’70s. Stewart took home 3 world titles and participated in the Can-Am championship. After his career as a race car driver ended he went on to become a popular commentator, consultant and team owner.

Sir John Young Stewart, OBE was born on 11 June 1939 in West Dunbartonshire. Stewart’s interest in cars was piqued at an early age as his family owned Dumbuck Garage in Milton. His father had previously been a motorcycle racer and his brother Jimmy was an increasingly popular race car driver. In 1953 he competed in the British Grand Prix with team Ecuri Ecosse. Although his parents discouraged their sons from racing after Jimmy was injured, Jackie accepted an offer by Barry Filer to test his cars at Oulton Park. During the test runs Jackie Stewart left a major impression on the spectators. Ken Tyrrell of Cooper soon heard of Jackie and quickly contacted his brother to organize a tryout. Tyrrell was suitably impressed by Stewart’s fast times and asked him to join the team in 1963.

In 1964 Jackie Stewart took part in Formula Three and had his first win at Snetterton Motor Racing Circuit. In 1965 he joined BRM so as to compete in Formula One. He debuted in South Africa and later gained a victory at the BRDC International Trophy. Unfortunately in 1966 he would have won the Indianapolis 500 had it not been for a mechanical problem and thus he was given the honor of Rookie of the Year. During the Belgian Grand Prix of 1966 Stewart was involved in a terrible crash due to rainy weather. The marshals were unable to help him, so his teammate Graham Hill rescued him. Because of this event Jackie Stewart began a campaign to improve safety in motor racing. Removable steering wheels and a main electrics switch became mandatory and BRM provided a medical truck.

In 1968 and 1969 Stewart drove F1 for Ken Tyrrell. Behind the steering wheel of a Matra MS80 Jackie Stewart became the 1969 World Champion. He once again became World Champion in 1971 and 1973. During his racing career, Jackie Stewart received great recognition including the Sports Illustrated “Sportsman of the Year” award and BBC’s “Sports Personality Of The Year” in 1973. In 2001 Stewart received the title Sir. Even after retiring as an F1 driver Jackie Stewart, The Flying Scot, has gone on to exert an influence on the sport.

Jody Scheckter

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

South African born Jody Scheckter is amongst the world’s top Formula One drivers of the past. Perhaps infamous because of his dangerous antics, but famous for his skill and speed, Scheckter has certainly etched his name into the history of auto racing.

Jody David Scheckter was born on 29 January 1950 in the town of East London, South Africa. He moved to Britain in 1970 and at the age of 22 began making a name for himself in Formula One. Scheckter’s debut was in a 1972 race at Watkins Glen, seated behind the wheel of a McLaren. In 1973 he took the Formula 5000 championship and competed in 5 F1 races. Unfortunately Scheckter tended to be a reckless driver and was involved in several accidents. At the British Grand Prix in 1973 his car spun out of control causing a massive pileup of race cars, quickly ending the race. This disastrous race nearly brought his F1 career to an end. In time Scheckter changed his attitude and adopted safer driving methods whilst making the best of his skills.

Tyrrell offered Jody Scheckter a full-time driver spot in 1974, which he accepted. In 1976 Scheckter drove the impressive Tyrrell P34, a 6-wheeled vehicle. Scheckter decided to join the new Wolf team in 1977. He took a win in the team’s first race. Following the 1978 season with Wolf, Jody Scheckter joined Ferrari. Many of his critics felt that he would not manage well under Ferrari’s management, but they were quickly proved wrong. In 1979 Jody Scheckter won the World Championship. He decided to retire in 1980 after an unsuccessful year of racing.

Upon retiring Jody Scheckter assisted his sons Tomas and Toby to pursue their careers in auto racing. Today he is an organic farmer and the founder of FATS (Firearms Training Systems). He has also appeared in documentaries regarding health issues. Despite his relatively unpopular start as an F1 driver, Jody Scheckter went on to make a real name for himself and is a legend in the sport of Formula One racing.

South African Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

The first South African Grand Prix, took place in 1934, hosted at the Prince George Circuit located in East London, in the Eastern Cape Province. World class drivers such as Dick Seaman, Bernd Rosemeyer and Luigi Villoresi were among the competitors, with Luigi Villoresi winning the South African Grand Prix in 1939.

The start of World War II saw the end of the racing for a time. With South Africa receiving Formula One status in 1962, going on to become a popular event. During to the infamous Apartheid-era in South Africa’s history, the Formula One South African Grand Prix was canceled on many occasions. The very first South African Grand Prix, as part of the Formula One calendar, took place on 29 December 1962. East London, once again, hosted the event and the South African Grand Prix returned to the Prince George Circuit in 1963 and in 1965.

The decision to move the Formula One South African Grand Prix, was made in 1967, and for as long as South Africa remained on the Formula One racing calendar, the Kyalami Circuit in the Gauteng Province (previously known as the Transvaal Province) remained its host. During the years 1962 and 1993, there were 23 Formula One Grand Prix races held at Kyalami Circuit. The Kyalami Circuit takes place over 78 laps, and the total racing distance is 320.112 kilometers.

The fasted lap time was achieved by John Watson in 1977, with a lap time of 1’17.630. This was also a race of great tragedy. A 19 year old student, named Jansen Van Vuuren, together with another mashall, were killed whilst rushing to the aid of Renzo Zorzi, whose Shadow had caught alight, and whilst crossing the track Van Vuuren was struck by Tom Pryce. The impact was so severe it killed both men instantly. Pryces’ injuries were from the fire extinguisher, and Van Vuuren was destroyed by the extreme force of impact. Another tragic loss of life was that of Peter Revson, who died in 1974 during his practice run. The last South African Grand Prix that was held at the Kyalami Circuit was in 1993.