Dover International Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Nicknamed ‘The Monster Mile’, Dover International Speedway is a NASCAR racetrack that can be found in Dover, Delaware. It is currently owned by Dover Motorsports and it also serves as the headquarters for this major motor sport company. The track was opened in 1969 and was designed by Melvin Joseph. The track is part of a massive racing and entertainment complex that features gambling and a horse racing track known as the Dover Downs. The Dover International Speedway got its nickname for being notoriously hard on the cars which race here. In 2004 the racetrack decided to adopt a new mascot known as the ‘Dover Monster’. Also known as ‘Miles’, the monster is a prominent feature on track tickets, memorabilia and even the winner’s trophy.

When the Dover International Speedway opened in 1969, it had far less seats than it does now. The first addition made to the seating took place in 1982 and more seats continued to be added in subsequent years. Today the track is capable of seating 140 000 people. The track is unique in a number of ways. The first is that it is a concrete track – one of only three and the first of its kind. The concrete gives the track a whitish appearance, which is rather different from the black, tarred race tracks found across the country. It is also exactly one mile in length, which means that it cannot accurately be classified as either a short track or a superspeedway. Initially both the entertainment complex, horse racing facilities and the speedway were owned by Dover Downs Entertainment but at the urging of NASCAR the speedway came under separate ownership. The current owners of the track, Dover Motorsports, was formerly known as Dover Downs Entertainment but it changed its name in 2002 for legal reasons.

Races currently held at the track include the Neighborhood Excellence 400 and the Dover 400 of the NEXTEL Cup series, the StonebridgeRacing.com 200 and the Dover 200 of the Busch Series and the AAA Insurance 200 of the Craftsman Truck Series. Thus far, the Dover International Speedway has played an integral role in the world of NASCAR racing with many top drivers making a name for themselves on the track. It is highly likely that the track will continue to play a prominent role in the popular sport of NASCAR, and that fans will continue to flock here for all the major events.

Evergreen Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Located a mere 25 miles northeast of Seattle, Evergreen Speedway is a majestic racing facility with a history dating back to its creation in 1954. Nestled in the expansive Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe, Washington, Evergreen Speedway has a solid record of standing-room-only attendance and support from the surrounding community. Much of the track’s success can be attributed to its unique design, which combines a 5/8-mile paved outer oval with a 3/8-mile inner oval, a 1/5-mile oval, a 1/8-mile drag strip, and a figure-eight track. The unification of the five venues within view of the 7,500-seat covered, and additional 7,500-seat modular grandstands has created a flexible Motorsports arena offering a diverse entertainment product to the auto racing fan base.

Dubbed “The Super-speedway of the West” by NASCAR racing legend David Pearson, Evergreen Speedway’s outer oval provides an exciting, high-speed playing field for some of NASCAR’s top touring divisions, while the smaller ovals and figure-eight track render a perfect venue for weekly NASCAR events.

In 1978, the helm of Evergreen Speedway was transferred to International Productions, Inc., owned and operated by the Beadle family. In the years that have followed, the Evergreen Speedway has enjoyed unparalleled success as the “gateway to automobile racing” in the Pacific Northwest.

In 1984, International Productions signed the prestigious Winston Racing Series sanctioning agreement with NASCAR, creating an alliance between the largest sanctioning body in the world and Evergreen Speedway – now renowned as the largest speedway in the northwest. Over the past twenty years, International Productions has distinguished itself as an innovator in the promotions business.

With northwestern racing fans hungry for a big NASCAR race in their own backyard, the Speedway hosted the inaugural Motorcraft 500 – a 500-lap NASCAR Winston West Series race – in July of 1985. For the region, it was the largest event in the history of NASCAR and over the years attracted some of the sport’s top drivers, including Bill Elliott, Geoff Bodine, Sterling Marlin, Harry Gant, Ken Schrader, Derrike Cope, and the late Davey Allison. Moving with the trends of the industry, International Productions recognized the surging support for the NASCAR REB-CO Northwest Tour, and responded by developing and promoting the 250-lap Coors Light 250, the longest event for the series.

In 1995, Evergreen Speedway landed on the schedule of the inaugural NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series season. With the national touring series came live television and radio coverage, exponential return on investments for Evergreen Speedway sponsors and a new, exciting entertainment product for the track’s thousands of patrons. Evergreen hosted the series until the year 2000.

Today the Evergreen Speedway is the venue for local and regional racing series events, including Mini Stocks, Monster Trucks, Les Schwab Street Stocks, Speedway Chevrolet Super Late Models, Crash Cars, Demolition Derbies, Autocross and drag racing.

Kentucky Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Located in Sparta, Kentucky, the Kentucky Speedway has played host to some of America’s most popular racing events, including the NASCAR Nationwide Series, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, IRL IndyCar Series, IRL Firestone Indy Lights, and the ARCA RE/MAX Series. It is a 1.5 mile tri-oval track measuring 70 feet wide with 12 foot shoulders and turns banked at 14 degrees. The grandstands have a seating capacity of more than 60,000 with a 2,000 seat Bluegrass Club and plenty of camping spaces and facilities to accommodate the crowds of racing enthusiasts attracted to the track by its program of events.

Some of the “firsts” recorded for the Kentucky Speedway include the first race on June 16, 2000, being the NASCAR Slim Jim All Pro Series “Kentucky 150”. The attendance at the event was 36,210 and the winner was Bill Bigley Jr., with an average speed of 111.747 mph in his #28 Peerless Woodworking/Nevamar Decorative Services Chevrolet. The purse was set at $95,050. The first pole sitter at this inaugural event was Brian Smith in his #20 Juba Glass Chevrolet Monte Carlo, with a qualifying time of 150.038 mph. The first winning crew chief was Bill Bigley, Sr.

In May 2008, Speedway Motorsports bought Kentucky Speedway from Jerry Carroll, with the deal finalized in October of that year. Its been reported that the new owners aim to secure a place in the NASCAR Sprint Series, but as at the end of 2009 this had not yet become a reality. Nonetheless, Kentucky Speedway continues to host the other events mentioned at the outset, offering auto racing enthusiasts a world-class venue to enjoy their favorite fast-paced sport.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Welcome to America’s speedway! The Indianapolis Motor Speedway was built on 328 acres of farmland 7 miles north-west of downtown Indianapolis in the spring of 1909. It didn’t start out as one of the most famous racetracks in the world. It was planned as a year-round testing facility for the fast-growing automobile industry in Indiana. Occasional race meets would be presented at the track, featuring those very same manufacturers racing their products against each other. The basic marketing logic being that spectators would be more apt to purchase a new car if they saw its performance on a race-track.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway was originally four turns, each banked at nine degrees and 12 minutes and measuring exactly 440 yards from entrance to exit, were linked together by a pair of long straights and, at the north and south ends of the property, by a pair of short straights to form a rectangular-shaped 2 ½ mile track as dictated by the confines of the available land.

Check out these track statistics:

Road Course: total track length: 2.605 miles (4.192 kilometers)
Main straight length: 3,037 feet (926 meters)
Back straight length: 1,755 feet (535 meters)
Total turns: 13 (Left turns – 4; Right turns – 9)
Average track width: 46 feet (14 meters)
Expected Lap Time: 72 seconds
Expected average speed: 130 mph (210 kph)
Expected highest speed: 187 mph (301 kph)
Race Distance: 190.294 miles (306.235 km), 73 laps
Time limit on Race: FIA rules stipulate that Formula 1 races have a maximum time limit of two hours. This race should be completed in less than two hours, barring an emergency stoppage.

The original surface of Indianapolis Motor Speedway was made of nothing but crushed rock and tar, which proved to be disastrous at the opening motorcycle and automobile racing events in August of 1909. So a staggering 3,200,000 paving bricks were imported by rail from the western part of the state. They were laid on their sides in a bed of sand and fixed with mortar, thus inspiring the nickname “The Brickyard.” The name has stood forever more.

Asphalt was first applied to the rougher portions of the track in 1936, and by 1941, all but the greater part of the straightaway had become blacktop. The remainder of the bricks were finally covered over in the fall of 1961. Most of the original paving bricks are still in place underneath the modern asphalt surface, with only the famous “yard of bricks” still exposed at the start/finish line as a nostalgic reminder of the past.

The track has changed ownership only twice. With Carl Fisher heavily involved in the development of Miami Beach and Jim Allison’s nearby engineering company growing rapidly, the foursome sold Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1927 to a group headed up by WWI flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker (Rickenbacker had actually driven in several Indy 500s before he ever knew how to fly).

These days the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, opened in 1909, is the world’s largest spectator facility and the only racetrack to host the Indy Racing League, NASCAR and Formula One. Since 1911, the Speedway has been the home of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” the Indianapolis 500 each May. The Allstate 400 at the Brickyard (formerly Brickyard 400) has quickly become one of NASCAR’s most coveted races since the inaugural event in 1994 and heats up the track in late July. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway completed the Triple Crown of Racing in 2000 with the addition of June’s United States Grand Prix, the only Formula One race run in the United States.

Kansas Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Kansas Speedway is conveniently located just 15 miles from downtown of Kansas City in the USA. With a history extending back to 1996, Kansas Speedway is a relatively young NASCAR track. Providing great NASCAR racing and top facilities, a day spent at Kansas Speedway is well worth it. NASCAR track Kansas Speedway is host to numerous events including NASCAR, IRL and ARCA races as well as community programs and driving schools. This great racing track is always filled with fun and good times, so why not check it out.

In October of 1996 the International Speedway Corporation came up with the idea to construct a race track in the Midwest of the USA. They selected Kansas City in 1997 as the site of a new speedway. 1998 saw the approval of financing for the project and construction began. In July 1999 the Kansas Speedway launched ticket sales with a great initiative, the Found Fan PASS which would allow ticket holders access to the best seats and other benefits. The NASCAR and the IRL made an announcement in May 2000 that they will be including events at Kansas Speedway on their calendar in 2001. On 21 August 2000 tickets for Kansas city Speedway went on sale internationally, and within 5 days almost 80% of all the tickets for the inaugural season were sold.

Visitors were allowed into Kansas Speedway for the first time on 2 June 2001 to watch the NASCAR Winston West Series and ARCA RE/MAX Series. In May 2001 the Kansas Speedway was named a tourism leader by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce and awarded accordingly. The first NASCAR Winston Cup Series to be held at Kansas Speedway took place on 29 September 2001 with Jeff Gordon gaining the victory. Since then the Kansas Speedway continues to attract massive crowds of eager racing fans to watch a number of thrilling events.

Kansas Speedway is a tri-oval track measuring 1.5 miles. The banking is 15 degrees in the turns and the track pavement width is at 55 feet. This fine speedway makes use of the SAFER Barrier (Steel and Foam Energy Reduction System). The grandstands are able to seat some 82 000 spectators and are set to be increased to a 150 000 capacity. Free parking is available for over 65 000 vehicles and visitors are certain to be able to make use of public transportation on race days. So, if NASCAR racing is your passion, head off to Kansas Speedway.

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