AT&T Williams F1 Team

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

The AT&T Williams F1 team, was established by Sir Frank Williams, together with Patrick Head. It was known at that time as the Williams Grand Prix Engineering team, and has since then become one of the three top contenders in the world of Formula One. In its history of Formula One racing, the Williams Team has walked away with nine Constructor’s titles. Their first race was at the Spanish Grand Prix in 1977, with Clay Regazzoni (from Switzerland) securing the first win for the team in 1979 at the British Grand Prix. The Williams team’s 100th win was made possible by Jacques Villeneuve in 1997 at the Hungarian Grand Prix. Together with McLaren and Ferrari, the Williams team consistently features amongst the top contenders. The chassis for the Williams F1 team, always has a “FW” followed by a number, being the initials for the proud team owner, Frank Williams.

Frank Williams had tried his hand in Formula One racing twice before founding Williams F1 in 1977. He previously had been running two operations, namely Walter Wolf Racing and Frank Williams Racing Cars. But it was the Williams team that brought him success. Many famous drivers have been behind the wheel of a Williams car, and to name a few: Nigel Mansell, Alain Prost, Keke Rosberg and Ayrton Senna. In 1994, Patrick Head, Frank Williams and the Williams designer, Adrian Newey, faced manslaughter charges, after the tragic and fatal accident at the San Marino Grand Prix in 1994, that took Ayrton Senna’s life. The three men were cleared of all charges in 2005.

The Williams team did not only have different drivers contributing to their success, but also different engines. Williams was able to win five Constructor titles with a Renault engine. Frank Williams did not achieve the success he so desired with his Frank Williams Racing Cars operation. He established the Walter Wolf Racing outfit after many promises from the millionaire, but due to the uncompetitive cars and unfulfilled promises, Williams relocated to Didcot, and the birth of Williams F1 had started. Williams recruited Patrick Head as engineer of his new project and the “William-Head” partnership lasted throughout the years. The following years would see many successes and many disappointments and heartbreaking losses, but despite all the challenges of the changing times, Williams has always come through.

2007 was a year of changes for the Williams F1 Team – Toyota supplied the engines for the season; Alexander Wurz moved up from his position as test driver to the team’s second driver, thereby replacing Mark Webber; Kazuki Nakajima took the position of test driver; and AT&T became the primary official sponsor of the team, after having withdrawn its sponsorship of McLaren when they signed with competitor Vodafone. Nico Rosberg remained the number one driver of the team and tallied up a respectable number of points for the Williams F1 Team. Wurz did not perform as well and upon announcing his retirement, test driver Nakajima took over for the final race of the season in Brazil where he started near the back of the grid and managed to finish in tenth spot.

With Nico Rosberg and Kazuki Nakajima as principle drivers, the Williams F1 Team had its fair share of both successes and disappointments in 2008, finishing the season eighth in the constructions championship. Despite a disappointing 2008 season and rumblings of discontent from Rosberg, both drivers stayed on with Williams for the 2009 season. Towards the end of the 2009 season it was announced that the team would not be renewing its partnership with Toyota and would be looking for a new engine supplier for 2010. This turned out to be the UK-based private company Cosworth, an automotive engineering company specializing in auto racing engines that supplied the Cosworth CA2010 for the Williams FW32 cars. By the end of 2009 the Williams F1 Team had claimed 9 Constructors’ Championships, 7 Drivers’ Championships, 113 race victories, 125 pole positions and 130 fastest laps. Drivers for the 2010 season are Rubens Barrichello and Nico Hulkenberg, with Valtteri Bottas as test driver.

Chip Ganassi Racing

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

The NASCAR element of the Chip Ganassi Racing team merged with Dale Earnhardt Inc to form Earnhardt Ganassi Racing.

Chip Ganassi Racing with Felix Sabates is an organization that supports several racing teams involved in NASCAR and IRL races. The association is co-owned by Chip Ganassi and Felix Sabates – both of whom are businessmen. Chip was a successful driver in his younger years and he made the decision to create a one-car IndyCar team in 1990. As a team owner Ganassi enjoyed immense success. In his first four years his team took five championship titles and 46 wins – the start to a long and successful period of racing. He made the decision to partner with Felix Sabates in 2000.

Sebates was never really a racer and he instead made his way into the world of stock car racing as an owner in 1987. This was easy since Sabates was a self-made millionaire from Cuba. He called his original team SABCO Racing and it was this team that Ganassi decided to purchase 80% of as he made his way into the ownership side of NASCAR racing. The Chip Ganassi Racing team is based in Concord, North Carolina. The teams currently race in the IndyCar Series and Rolex Sports Car Series. Dodge has been the car of choice since Ganassi took over the running of the operation – a collaboration which has definitely been advantageous.

Just before the NASCAR team merged with Dale Earnhardt Inc. in November 2008, five drivers worked for the team. David Stemme started racing at the age of 15 and he has raced in the Busch Series and the NEXTEL Cup. Reed Sorenson started racing at the age of six and he went on to become a rookie phenomenon. He too was driving in the Busch Series and the NEXTEL Cup. Born in New Zealand, Scott Dixon was the team’s IndyCar driver. He impressed right from the start – winning his IndyCar debut and going on perform well in successive races. Dan Wheldon hails from England and is also an IndyCar driver. He has enjoyed an immensely successful career both in the states and abroad and is likely to continue to impress both his employers and fans. Scott Pruett is usually the man of choice for the Rolex Series. He has competed in a number of different forms of motorsports and proven to be successful at each one. All five drivers of Chip Ganassi Racing will likely continue to prove their worth in years to come.

Robert Yates Racing

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Yates Racing merged with Richard Petty Motorsports in 2009.

Robert Yates Racing is based in Mooresville, North Carolina and is an official NASCAR racing team. Robert Yates owns the team and at the moment has two cars, number 88 and 38 Fords that are racing in the NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series. David Gilliland drives #38 and has sponsorship from Masterfoods, USA. Number 88 will be driven by Ricky Rudd during the 2007 season and is also sponsored by Masterfoods.

Ford Racing motors in partnerships with Robert Yates Racing and Roush Racing produce the powerful engines Robert’s cars have. In the past Robert’s motors have been known as the most powerful engines in NASCAR, whereas Roush has been known as a consistent motor. The combination has produced excellent and dominant engines since 2004 and since 2006 all Ford teams in the NEXTEL Cup have been using the Yates/Roush engines.

In 1996 Dale Jarrett took over driving #88 and is still part of the Robert’s team. Dale has had numerous wins over the years and has recorded the most wins out of all the drivers in Robert’s team. For the 2006 season Jarrett will move to Michael Waltrip Racing team, but #88 will still be raced in 2007.

Robert Yates took on Davey Allison as his first driver. Allison drove the #28 Havoline Ford till the mid-1993, making 15 wins and finishing 3rd in points twice over the years. A disastrous crash in a helicopter tragically killed Allison in 1993. Lake Speed, Robby Gordon and Ernie Irvan split the rest of the duties left in the season. Irvan successfully won twice and the following year he won three times in the #28 but was badly injured in a crash, leaving Kenny Wallace to take over.

In 1995 Dale Jarrett replaced Irvan who was still struggling to recuperate. That year he won at Pocono Raceway, finishing 16th in points. Ernie Irvan competed in three races in the #88 but soon switched over to the #28, expanding the racing team to a two-team setup. By 1997 his term with Robert Yates racing team came to an end. In 2003 Elliott Sadler was hired to drive #28 and with the car he won twice. Yates made a few changes; firstly he changed sponsorship to M&M’s and then changed the car number to #38. David Gilliland is the current driver of #38 and will drive in the 2007 season.

Ferrari F1 Team

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Scuderia Ferrari is the name of the Ferrari automobile company’s Formula One racing team. Literally translated, the team’s name is Italian for “Ferrari Stable”, but it is more commonly referred to as “Team Ferrari.”

Scuderia Ferrari was first founded in 1929, racing till 1939 for Alfa Romeo. Ferrari’s first attempt at competing in Formula One was in 1950, and through the decades has seen much success. This makes Ferrari one of the oldest, as well as the most successful team racing currently in Formula One. For many years the team has been top of the F1 racing world, holding a host of different records for the drivers’ championships, podium finishes, the most constructors’ championships, wins, points and so on.

Recent years have seen much of the team’s victorious streak being linked to Michael Schumacher. He has been the most dominant competitor and consistent champion in all of the history of F1 racing. Michael Schumacher retired from F1 racing at the end of the 2006 season.

Felipe Massa had a great 2006 season with two wins and finishing third over all, and the Ferrari team signed up Kimi Raikkonen for the 2007 season to replace Schumacher. Ferrari launched a new car, naming it the F2007, and with Kimi Räikkönen behind the wheel, the car crossed the finish line first in the inaugural race of the 2007 season. The Ferrari F1 Team went on to win the 2007 Constructor’s Championship, however controversy involving espionage carried out by a Ferrari employee and a McLaren engineer hung as a dark cloud over the team that year until the matter was resolved.

The 2008 season opened with disappointing results for Ferrari, but things started to look up when Kimi Raikonnin took first place at the Malaysian Grand Prix. The team’s use of a traffic light-type system to signal drivers to leave the pit-stop counted against them when it was triggered too soon resulting in Massa driving off with the fuel pipe still attached at the 2008 Singapore Grand Prix. The 2009 Championships had the worst season start in the team’s history, suffering a further setback when Massa was injured by a part from a competitor’s car which hit him on the helmet and knocked him out while he was traveling at 162 mph. Fortunately, no accident resulted, but his injuries prevented him from competing for the rest of the season, and Ferrari finished in fourth place in the Constructors’ Championship.

The Scuderia Ferrari Marlboro team for 2010 has Felipe Massa and Fernando Alonso as principle drivers, with test and reserve drivers being Giancarlo Fisichella, Luca Badoer and Marc Gené.

Competitive Edge Motorsports

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Competitive Edge Motorsports closed in 2006.

Joe Auer is the principle owner of Competitive Edge Motorsports, a team that was once a NASCAR Nextel Cup Series team. Joe has been involved with sports on a whole for nearly 50 years and is well remembered as an outstanding pro football player for the NFL. Auer was the one who took the opening kickoff in the first game Miami Dolphins had ever competed in. From there he became the dolphins first MVP. His pro career saw Auer play for the Atlantic Falcons and Buffalo Bills in various seasons. Later he turned his attention to car racing.

Joe Auer has been involved with racing for over 3 decades and continues to enjoy it. Auer also has interests in things besides sport and is owner and president of ICN, a very successful global technology consulting and training firm, which he founded in 1975. Competitive Edge Motorsports made its debut at the Coca-Cola 600 in 2004 with driver Kevin Lepage fielding the #51 Marathon Oil Chevrolet. Lepage finished 43rd at the race because of his car suffering from overheating failures. Lepage ran another four more races but with out much success, resulting in DNF’s for all of them. With the team not doing to well CEM had to replace Lepage with Tony Raines who from there took over as driver for the team. He finished 28th at Dover, his best finish out of all his races he had taken on so far.

The year 2005 saw another change in driver, with ARCA racer Stuart Kirby taking over. Kirby qualified for a total of seven races, with his best point position being 31st. The following year Mike Garvey drove for the CEM team but with four finishes all of which were 38th position or worse, left Marathon Oil, the sponsor, no choice but to move to Petty Enterprises. Competitive Edge Motorsports had full intentions of having the team perform full time in 2007 but that was not to happen. Later that year the team was made to fold and sell its equipment when it was unable to find alternative sponsorship to fund it.

« Previous PageNext Page »