Kansas Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Kansas Speedway is conveniently located just 15 miles from downtown of Kansas City in the USA. With a history extending back to 1996, Kansas Speedway is a relatively young NASCAR track. Providing great NASCAR racing and top facilities, a day spent at Kansas Speedway is well worth it. NASCAR track Kansas Speedway is host to numerous events including NASCAR, IRL and ARCA races as well as community programs and driving schools. This great racing track is always filled with fun and good times, so why not check it out.

In October of 1996 the International Speedway Corporation came up with the idea to construct a race track in the Midwest of the USA. They selected Kansas City in 1997 as the site of a new speedway. 1998 saw the approval of financing for the project and construction began. In July 1999 the Kansas Speedway launched ticket sales with a great initiative, the Found Fan PASS which would allow ticket holders access to the best seats and other benefits. The NASCAR and the IRL made an announcement in May 2000 that they will be including events at Kansas Speedway on their calendar in 2001. On 21 August 2000 tickets for Kansas city Speedway went on sale internationally, and within 5 days almost 80% of all the tickets for the inaugural season were sold.

Visitors were allowed into Kansas Speedway for the first time on 2 June 2001 to watch the NASCAR Winston West Series and ARCA RE/MAX Series. In May 2001 the Kansas Speedway was named a tourism leader by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce and awarded accordingly. The first NASCAR Winston Cup Series to be held at Kansas Speedway took place on 29 September 2001 with Jeff Gordon gaining the victory. Since then the Kansas Speedway continues to attract massive crowds of eager racing fans to watch a number of thrilling events.

Kansas Speedway is a tri-oval track measuring 1.5 miles. The banking is 15 degrees in the turns and the track pavement width is at 55 feet. This fine speedway makes use of the SAFER Barrier (Steel and Foam Energy Reduction System). The grandstands are able to seat some 82 000 spectators and are set to be increased to a 150 000 capacity. Free parking is available for over 65 000 vehicles and visitors are certain to be able to make use of public transportation on race days. So, if NASCAR racing is your passion, head off to Kansas Speedway.

Milwaukee Mile

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Milwaukee Mile is a racetrack found in West Allis, Wisconsin, USA. It has been one of the main venues for American motor sports since 1903, holding at least one race a year. It is officially the oldest operating motor speedway throughout the world, with Indianapolis Motor Speedway beginning eight years later in 1911. The Milwaukee Mile has played a large part in determining the face of auto racing during the past century.

Before 1953 the Milwaukee Mile was operated as a dirt track, but was paved in 1954, leaving the dirt infield track for weekly programs that took place during the 50’s and 60’s. It was repaved again once the 1967 season came to a closure and by 1970 the quarter mile dirt track and the half-mile road course were converted to accommodate the pit area.

The Legendary Oval has a list of past winners that are part of racing history, including names such as Dale Earnhardt Jr., Barney Oldfield, Parnelli Jones, Rex Mays, A.J. Foyt, the Unsers and the Andrettis. The track is also known for being the only track to hold races for the Indy Racing League, NASCAR and the Champ Car World Series. NASCAR used Milwaukee for two Busch Series stock car races in 1984 and 1985. In 1993 the NASCAR Busch Series went back to Milwaukee where Steve Grissom won the event. Since then the Busch Series has been running every year from the Milwaukee Mile. Similarly the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series began its course in Milwaukee in 1995 and has returned every season.

After hosting NASCAR and IndyCar Series races for many years, it was announced at the end of 2009 that the Milwaukee Mile would not be hosting any events for these two sanctioning bodies in 2010. Instead the races traditionally held in Wisconsin will be hosted by Road America. Nevertheless, this legendary oval will no doubt continue to play a role in hosting other auto racing events.

NHRA

February 9, 2009 by  
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The acronym NHRA stands for National Hot Rod Association, the governing body for drag racing in the USA that both establishes regulations and organizes events across the country. The NHRA also seeks to promote drag racing and increase the sport’s popularity with fans while retaining sponsors for events and participants.

Founded in 1951 in California by Wally Parks, the NHRA saw as its prime mandate the need to get Hot Rodders off the streets and onto legal drag strips where safety for both racers and the general public could be ensured. Today, the NHRA is the largest drag racing authority in the world, with 300 employees, 80,000 members and 35,000 licensed competitors. The NHRA has over 140 member tracks throughout North America.

The most prestigious NHRA drag racing event in North America is the U.S. Nationals that are held bi-annually in summer and winter. This popular drag racing competition is held at the Indianapolis Raceway Park, home of the legendary Indy 500. The NHRA also stages the PowerAde Drag Racing Series. This series is made up of four classes: Pro Stock, Pro Stock Motorcycle, Top Fuel Dragster and Top Fuel Funny Car. Other sportsman classes are held for amateur, or “Sunday” racers, who would like to compete.

The NHRA supports many special educational initiatives such as the Youth and Education Services program and the Street Legal program. NHRA events attract thousands of loyal fans, and members are enthusiastic about their chosen sport. Schedules for upcoming NHRA events can be found in newspapers, racing magazines and online.