Morgan McClure Motorsports

February 9, 2009 by  
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In 1983 Morgan McClure Motorsports, or MMM, was formed by Larry McClure and his business partner Tim Morgan. They had purchased a racing car from G.C. Spencer, a NASCAR racing veteran, and recruited the brothers Ed, Teddy and Jerry McClure later in the same year.

Morgan McClure Motorsports entered into their first NASCAR Winston Cup race at the then Alabama International Motor Speedway, now known as Talladega Super Speedway, in 1983. The No. 4 MMM Chevrolet that was sponsored by Oldsmobile, was driven by Connie Slayter. Unfortunately, the car blew its engine, and the team had to settle for 40th place.

MMM’s familiar yellow No. 4 Oldsmobile was unloaded in June 1986, as they had secured a sponsorship from Kodak. This would be the beginning of an 18 year relationship between Kodak and MMM, considered one of the longest sponsorships in the sport. In July 1988, Wilson and MMM both had their career best finish at the Pepsi 400, which was held at the Daytona International Speedway. Wilson came in second, after leading the race for 19 laps.

The 1990s also proved to be successful for the team. In 1990 the made the important decision to recruit Ernie Irvan to drive their No. 4 car. In the very first race that he drove for the team, Irvan started from a 30th spot and moved his way up to finish third. Another big decision that was made that year was to go over to Chevrolet, and gain more support from the vehicle manufacturer. No matter what, there just was no stopping Ernie Irvan. In 1991 he won the Great American Race held at the Daytona 500, won the Budweiser held in Watkins Glen and made the partnership between MMM and himself a force to be reckoned with.

Through the following years, Morgan McClure Motorsports have changed drivers, and strategies, and each time they have proved themselves to be even better than before. MMM’s twelve year partnership with Chevrolet came to an end in 2003 and it celebrated its 20th year anniversary. The success and growth had started with a dream shared by two men, and three employees to become one of the most popular and well knows companies on the track today.

Cale Yarborough

February 9, 2009 by  
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William Caleb Yarborough, was born in South Carolina on 27 March 1939. This legendary figure is a former NASCAR driver and owner in the Winston Cup Series and a businessman. Cale Yarborough is one of the only two NASCAR drivers to win three championships consecutively. His face has also been seen on the cover of the popular magazine, Sports Illustrated.

On NASCAR’s all winner’s list, the name Cale Yarborough appears at number five, due to his 83 wins. But his achievements do not end there. Yarborough won the Daytona 500 in the years 1968, 1977, 1983 and again in 1984. He also became the first NASCAR driver, in 1984, to qualify with a top speed of over 200 miles per hour, for the Daytona 500.

Many mistakenly believed that Cale Yarborough was related to LeeRoy Yarbrough, another NASCAR veteran driver. The truth is, that Cale Yarborough was the son of a tobacco farmer. He attended his first race, without a ticket, as a young boy. It was the Southern 500, and the year was 1950. He was so desperate to drive, that he even lied about his age, which NASCAR picked up and promptly disqualified him. Yarborough returned to the Southern 500 in 1957, and made his debut driving for Bob Weatherly. He was behind the wheel of the #30 Pontiac, and after suffering complications with the car’s hubs, he worked himself two places up from his 44th starting position, to finish 42nd. The Southern States Fairground in 1960, was the race in which he secured his first top fifteen place and at the Daytona 500 Qualifying Race, in 1962, he finished in the top ten.

Cale Yarborough signed on with Herman Beam in 1963, to drive his #19 Ford, and at Savannah and Myrtle Beach, he finished both races in fifth place. He started the following season with Herman Beam, but finished the season with Holman Moody. Yarborough drove for a few owners, and ended up with Banjo Matthews in the beginning of the 1966 season. He finished in second place, twice, consecutively but left the team to join the Wood Brothers, driving their #21 Ford. Due to Yarborough only driving in 17 races, he was placed 20th in the standings, even though he won the Firecracker 400 and the Atlanta 500. He also went on to win the Daytona 500 for the Wood Brothers and the Firecracker 400. He ended the season with a total of six wins. This moved him up in the standings, to 17th position. In 1980, Yarborough secured fourteen pole positions, winning six races and lost, by nineteen points, to Dale Earnhardt, who took the championship. Darrell Waltrip replaced Cale Yarborough at the end of the racing season. Yarborough then announced that he would only run part time, which he did for the rest of his career.

He won many more races, and brought home the win for various teams, ending his career while racing for Harry Ranier. Hardee’s had offered to sponsor Yarborough as a driver and owner of #29. He raced his final season in 1988, after which he retired. To add to his interesting career, Cale played himself in two TV episodes of The Dukes of Hazard. The episodes were called “Cale Yarborough comes to Hazard” in 1984 and “The Dukes meet Cale Yarborough” which aired in 1979. He also starred in the movie Stoker Ace, with Burt Reynolds, in 1983. Cale Yarborough is a legendary driver that has had a wonderful career, and made colorful memories to remember him by. He was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993.

Darrell Waltrip

February 9, 2009 by  
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Darrell Lee Waltrip is a former three-time NASCAR Winston Cup champion as well as the 1989 Daytona 500 winner. At the moment Waltrip is working at Fox Broadcasting Company as a television race commentator. His racing days started off in Kentucky, but with his growing success it led him to move to Nashville, Tennessee. There he raced at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds on the Nashville Speedway USA, where he won two track championships. Darrell Waltrip did a lot to help promote races by appearing on the local television program, something many other competitors refused to do.

In 1972 Waltrip started in the Cup level driving an old Mercury Cyclone, which was his primary car during the first few seasons. At the Cup level races Darrell drove aggressively and was known for his outspoken style, which earned him the nickname “Jaws” as given by his rival Cale Yarborough. The year 1980 was the height of Waltrip’s NASCAR success but at the same time it was where he had to endure criticism from his fans. Eventually he used his wit and silliness to win their hearts over.

Darrell Waltrip had much success with Junior Johnson, a car owner, winning three national championships. However, there was concern with Waltrips involvement with Budweiser as it created this image of alcohol, fast cars, and success. With that Darrell Waltrip made a move to Hendrick motors. In 1989 Waltrip won the Daytona 500 for the first time in his entire race career. That same year a lot of pressure was placed on Darrell to win one more race, that being the Heinz Southern 500 in Darlington. If he did so, he would earn himself one million dollar bonus for having won four majors in one season.

However he did not cope well with the pressure as he also had the added strain of winning the Career Grand Slam. This led to him hitting the wall early on in the race, putting him out of the race as a contender. The year 1990 also proved unsuccessful. While practicing for the Pepsi 400, Waltrip spun out in another car’s oil and suffered a broken leg, two broken arms and a concussion.

Darrell retired from racing in 2000 and upon retirement signed up with Fox as an analyst on the network’s NASCAR telecasts.

Davey Allison

February 9, 2009 by  
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David Carl Allison was born on 25 February 1961 in Hollywood as the eldest child of Bobby and Julie Allison. During his lifetime he built a fine reputation as Robert Yates Racing’s best NASCAR driver, driving their #28 Texaco-Havoline Ford. Bobby Allison was a NASCAR driver, and it was inevitable that Davey Allison would follow in his father’s footsteps. The Allison family moved to Alabama and, together with Bobby’s brother, Donnie and two family friends, namely Neil Bonnett and Red Farmer, everyone in the racing circles knew them as the Alabama Gang.

After graduating from high school, Davey began working with Bobby Allison’s Winston Cup Team during the day, and at night Davey and his friends (affectionately known as the Peach Fuzz Gang) worked on Davey’s Chevy Nova. Birmingham International Raceway, in 1979, was the start to Davey Allison’s career. He had managed to secure a win in his sixth start and regularly won the BIR. By the year 1983, Davey had worked his way up to the Automobile Racing Club of America Series or ARCA. In the same year, he took the first place in both the ARCA events that took place at the Talledega Superspeedway, and in 1984 he received the ARCA Rookie of the Year, after the series title placed him second, and that same year he married Deborah.

Harry Ranier had been keeping a close eye on Davey, and had already chosen him to replace Cale Yarborough, who at that time was racing the Ranier-Lundy #28 Ford Thunderbird, but was leaving to start his own venture with Hardee’s. The date, 3 May 1987, would be remembered in the NASCAR history. The qualifying times for the Winston 500 that were held at the Talledega Superspeedway, set the scene for a spectacular show-down. Bill Elliot and Bobby Allison would start alongside each other, with first and second place, respectively. Davey Allison would pull away in third place. Bobby Allison drove over debris on the 22nd lap, cutting his rear tire and causing his car to slide, lift and crash into the spectator fence. The race ended up being red flagged for almost four hours, due to a few injured spectators. Bobby Allison walked away without injury.

Davey was still upfront when the race resumed, and Bill Elliot was forced to drop out of the race due to engine failure. Starting second on the restart, Davey managed to pass the race leader, Dale Earnhardt, and became the first rookie, since 1981 when Ron Bouchard won, to win a Winston Cup Event. Davey would go on to many disappointments, near death accidents and team changes, but he won a number of races in spectacular fashion. His wins include the Budweiser 500 in 1987, the Champion Spark Plug 400 and Miller High Life 400 in 1988, the Winston 500 and Pepsi 400 in 1989, the Valleydale Meats 500 and Mello Yello 500 in 1990, clocking up an amazing five wins in 1991, being the Coca-Cola 600, Banquet Frozen Foods 300, Miller Genuine Draft 400, AC Delco 500 and Pyroil 500, with another five wins in 1992, being the Daytona 500, First Union 400, Winston 500, Miller Genuine Draft 400 and Pyroil 500K. Davey ended his career with winning the Pontiac Excitement 400 in 1993.

On 12 July 1993, Davey Allison was underway to Neil and David Bonnet who were test driving a new car for David Bonnets Busch Series debut, in his new Hughes 396 helicopter. Red Farmer, another legendary driver, had joined Allison on the trip. On landing, the helicopter suddenly nosed up and crashed to the ground. Neil was able to free Red Farmer, but had to wait for Paramedics to free Davey. Davey Allison died on 13 July 1993, leaving behind his second wife, Liz, and two children. In 1998, Davey Allison was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame.

Dale Earnhardt Sr.

February 9, 2009 by  
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Dale Earnhardt Snr was one of the greatest NASCAR drivers, known for his aggressive style of driving. Known by numerous nicknames such as “The Intimidator”, “The Dominator”, “Big E” and “Ironhead”, Dale Earnhardt was one of the most popular drivers in NASCAR. Aside from his distinctive personality and driving ability, Earnhardt earned his place in autoracing history with his Winston Cup Series victories and as the winner of 7 championships.

Ralph Dale Earnhardt was born on 29 April 1951 in Kannapolis of North Carolina. Born into a family where his father, Ralph, was a top NASCAR short-track driver, it is little wonder that Dale became interested in the sport. Dale Earnhardt, Sr. debuted in the Winston Cup in the year 1975, and in his first race driving an Ed Negre, he passed the finish line in 22nd place. In 1979 Earnhardt joined Rod Osterlund Racing, and during his rookie season, he won Rookie of the Year after gaining four poles and several great finishes. 1980 was filled with success for Earnhardt and he clinched the Winston Cup championship. Earnhardt moved to Richard Childress Racing in 1981, and although he had a bad season in 1982, he came back with remarkable strength in 1983. He gained his second Winston Cup Championship in 1986. Earnhardt saw a grand victory in 1986, once again winning, by 288 points.

The 1990s were off to a good start when Earnhardt won the Winston Cup for the 4th time in his career. He repeated this victory again in 1991, 1993 and 1994 – a total of 7 Winston Cup championship wins. He suffered a grave accident in 1996 which led the NASCAR officials to mandate the “Earnhardt Bar”. Fortunately Dale Earnhardt survived, although he had several broken bones. In 1998 Earnhardt finally gained victory at the Daytona 500, a win he had been aiming for for some 20 years. Earnhardt excited the crowds in 2000 with two thrilling wins, neck-in-neck with Bobby Labonte.

Sadly Dale Earnhardt Sr. was involved in a terrible accident in the 2001 Daytona 500 and lost his life. The death of Dale Earnhardt led to much media speculation, extensive coverage and great public concern. Following his death, NASCAR placed greater emphasis on safety with better restraints, safer barriers, strict rules for vehicle inspection and the development of a roof escape system.

Dale Earnhardt Sr. received many awards in his lifetime for his exceptional role in NASCAR, and in 1998 was placed second in NASCAR’s 50 Greatest Drivers. Earnhardt was named Most Popular NASCAR Driver of 2001 and was an inductee of the Motorsports Hall of Fame Of America in 2002. Recently, in 2006 he was also inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame. His son Dale Earnhardt Jr. continues in his father’s footsteps as a successful driver. Earnhardt also left behind three other children, namely, Kelley King, Taylor and Kerry. Dale Earnhardt Snr was certainly a force to be reckoned with on the race track and will always be remembered for his grand achievements.

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