NASCAR’s Innovative FMEC Unveiled

January 15, 2013 by  
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NASCAR and Hewlett-Packard have joined forces to develop a unique resource to serve the partners and fans of America’s favorite motorsport – the NASCAR Fan and Media Engagement Center. The innovative technology platform, which will provide near real-time analysis of NASCAR happenings, was unveiled on Monday January 14, with the endorsement of NASCAR Chairman and CEO Brian France who was quoted as saying that NASCAR believes the system “has the potential to be the best of its kind in sports”. France was joined by HP Enterprise Services Vice President Charles Salameh in the ceremonial ribbon cutting ceremony to open the center based at NASCAR Plaza in Charlotte, NC.

Located on the 8th floor of NASCAR Plaza, the Fan and Media Engagement Center (FMEC) features all-glass walls, thirteen HP displays with the latest touchscreen audio visual technology. Custom designed by HP, the system is capable of processing significant amounts of data and presenting it in a format which is relevant to fans and the NASCAR industry. Salameh noted that the FMEC allows “real-time data capture and analysis across a wide variety of media, traditional as well as digital”, also pointing out that the information can be “tailored to specific audiences within the industry”.

The FMEC took eighteen months to develop with the goal of benefiting all parties involved in NASCAR racing – tracks, teams, broadcast partners and sponsors – to receive detailed information on how the media and fans are reacting to events, almost as they happen. All going well, race tracks will more effectively be able to track how effective ticket promotions are, while new sponsors will get feedback on how they are perceived in this fast-paced sport, with a host of other applications available. Broadcasters will even receive feedback on which camera angles are most appreciated by fans. The gathering and input of information from all media sectors will give NASCAR the opportunity to respond quickly to any controversies or erroneous media reports.

At the ceremony France noted that the FMEC will allow the NASCAR industry to interact with fans in ways that had never been dreamed of before and this will be done “in real-time, in almost every medium, all over the country”. No doubt fans are looking forward to seeing this new NASCAR innovation in action.

Interlagos Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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It was Emerson Fittipaldi’s tremendous championship performance on the international racing circuit in 1973 and ’74 that led to the creation of the Brazilian Grand Prix in the city of Sao Paulo – Fittipaldi’s home town.

With its 5-mile length, the Interlagos Speedway at Sao Paulo is one of the toughest tracks that racers face on the Grand Prix circuit. Sitting in a natural amphitheatre allows spectators a great view of the track from virtually anywhere, but from the vantage point of the driver’s seat, Interlagos is bumpy and irregular. Plus, running the track counter-clockwise and at a high altitude creates added challenges for drivers, as does the unrelenting heat and humidity.

In the early 1980s, Sao Paulo’s city council agreed to a $15m rebuilding program for the Interlagos Speedway, which by this time had fallen into some serious disrepair. It was decided not to retain the old circuit but use sections of it, linked by new sections of road. The new track turned sharply left just after the pits, before diving downhill through an S curve.

Taking a look at the track in modern times — the drivers jet out to the Descida do Sol, which suddenly drops downhill to the left. Then comes “S do Senna” (“Senna’s S”), a series of turns (left, right, then left again) that are considered extremely difficult because each of them has a different angle, a different radius, a different length, a different inclination (inward or outward) and a different shape (besides the terrain goes down and then up again).

“Senna’s S” connects with “Curva do Sol” (“Sun Turn”), a round-shaped large-radius left-turn that leads to “Reta Oposta”, the track’s longest (but not the fastest) straight line. Reta Oposta is succeeded by two leftwise, uphill turns that are called “Subida do Lago” (“Up to the Lake”) and then “Mergulho” (“Dive”), a short straight section that goes down again.

After “Mergulho” comes the slow section, the one most despised by inexperienced drivers for its sheer difficulty, with small, kart-like turns and unpredictable ups-and-downs. These turns are “Ferradura” (“Horseshoe”) rightwise and downhill in two steps; “Pinheirinho” (“Pine Tree”), an S-type section (right, then left) on a plain field; “Bico de Pato” (“Duck’s Beak”), two rightwise turns (one easy, the other very slow and difficult); and then two left turns forming a section called “Juncao” (Junction).

After the slow section begins the long, thrilling and dangerous top-speed section. The first step is “Subida dos Boxes” (“Up to the Pits”), a long, left turn that sometimes seems straight and sometimes bends in more clearly. As the name implies, Subida dos Boxes is uphill (quite steep, indeed) and demands a lot of power from the cars. At the end of it there are two turns (14 and 15) that form what was once called “Cotovelo” (“Elbow”) at this point the track seems inclined inwards (or somewhat crooked).

All in all, the local economy of Sao Paulo has benefited from the upgraded track, and visitors are sure to enjoy the thrills and excitement presented by the Brazilian Grand Prix.

Auto Racing Services

February 9, 2009 by  
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A modern auto racing team simply cannot function without the various services that they depend on to keep their cars performing at a fine edge. Many such services are offered to racecar owners and drivers, including dynamometer testing to measure engine performance, fabrication of metal or plastic body components, tuning, structural engineering, sub-contracting of repairs and specialized welding of alloy metals. Companies offering these types of services may specialize in a particular field such as car bodywork, while others may offer many services and act as “one-stop shops”. The auto racing service industry fills the need for specialized yet standard parts that are just too costly for individual teams to produce and/or conduct on their own.

There’s a lot of competition in the auto racing services industry, so if you’re a new team owner or are relatively new to the auto racing scene, it’s a good idea to shop around to find the best deals. Ensure that whomever you decide to use has a proven track record and is reliable – your success on the track as well as the safety of the driver may well depend on it.

Consulting services are available from specialized companies for pre-race setup, testing and other race day services.

If you are a company that offers auto racing services and would like to advertise at Autoracing.com, please contact us for prompt assistance.

Sepang International Circuit

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Sepang International Circuit, or as it is also known the Sepang F1 International Circuit, does not only host the Formula 1 Malaysian Grand Prix, but is home to the A1 Grand Prix and the Moto GP Malaysian Grand Prix. Many other motor sport events are also hosted here during the year.

Compared to other Grand Prix venues, the Sepang International Circuit ranks amongst the best, with the facilities and the technology to back that statement. The media resources that the circuit has available and the fantastic pit area, are facilities that the Sepang F1 International Circuit can be proud of. The grandstands and amenities for spectators are also superb, ensuring comfort and a great view of the action.

The designer of this amazing circuit was Hermann Tilke, from Germany, who has designed similar superb facilities in Bahrain, Turkey and Shanghai. The 5.54 kilometer main circuit, is usually raced clockwise, and is known for its wide straits and somewhat sweeping corners. The track was built in a very unusual manner, as only an extremely tight hairpin corner, separates the pit straight and the long back straight.

Configurations of the Sepang International Circuit can be varied for use. It allows the clockwise directed north circuit to be utilized, which is situated on the first half of the Sepang F1 Circuit. After turn number six, the track turns toward the pit straight, and is a total of 2.71 kilometers in length. The opposite side of the race track, forms the south circuit. On this circuit, the long back straight, that is used on the main circuit, then becomes the pit straight. The pit straight for the south circuit runs into the main circuits’ number eight corner, which then forms a hairpin corner. As with all the circuits at the Sepang F1 Circuit, the south circuit is also raced in a clockwise direction, and is a total length of 2.61 kilometers. Due to the versatility of the Sepang International Circuit, it is also able to host motocross and kart racing at the track.

Nazareth Speedway

February 9, 2009 by  
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Nazareth Speedway, though not currently in operation, was a well known NASCAR racing track. The circuit of Nazareth Speedway is located in Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania, USA. In use since 1910, the track has been the site of several great motorsport events. Nazareth Speedway is a 1 mile oval and is sometimes still used for testing. Let us take a look at the history of this well-known NASCAR track.

As previously mentioned, motor sport events were taking place in the area during the 1910s. The dirt track of Nazareth was renovated and opened in 1966. Named Nazareth National Speedway, the track was 1.125 miles with 5 turns. Only one event was held in this inaugural season with Frankie Schneider taking the lead. In 1967 Nazareth Speedway hosted 9 events, 5 of which were won again by Schneider. Five modified events were held in 1968. On 13 July 1968 the track was host to USAC Dirt Champ cars. Al Unser won the race. Mario Andretti, a local racer, took the lead in the 1969 USAC Dirt Champ car race. After holding some 52 races, Nazareth National Speedway was closed in November of 1971.

In 1982 Lindy Vicari took over management of the Nazareth Speedway. Vicari had a new shorter 1 mile oval track constructed in place of the old dirt track. It was once again closed in 1984. Roger Penske decided to purchase Nazareth Speedway in 1986. He had it paved and it was once again opened in 1987 under the name of Pennsylvania International Raceway. The track featured a warm-up lane designed by Rick Mears. It received the name Nazareth Speedway in 1993. As the track was actually a little shorter than 1 mile, the CART sanctioning body ruled that it was to be advertised at its correct length of 0.946 miles. Races that went on for 200 laps were then increased to 225 laps. Nazareth Speedway came to host top IRL and Busch Series events. Unfortunately it was closed in 2004. Despite this, Nazareth Speedway can still be seen in NASCAR 07, an EA Sports video game. The future of Nazareth Speedway is still uncertain, though it is very unlikely that NASCAR vehicles will grace this track again.

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