Malaysian F1 Grand Prix Victory to Alonso

March 26, 2012 by  
Filed under News

Battling inclement weather, yesterday’s Malaysian F1 Grand Prix provided plenty of auto racing action, with Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso taking the checkered flag, followed by Sauber’s Sergio Perez and McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton, with Red Bull’s Mark Webber and Lotus’ Kimi Raikkonen taking fourth and fifth place. With his latest victory, Alonso has moved into fifth place on the career victories list – one place ahead of legendary three-time world champion Jackie Stewart. In a post-race interview, Alonso congratulated the team for doing a great job, and noted that in light of their performance in Australia, and in the qualifying rounds in Malaysia, he considered the win to be a big surprise.

While the performance by seasoned drivers Alonso, Hamilton, Raikkonen and Webber was impressive, the second-place win by 22-year-old Sergio Perez was considered to be spectacular, with his enthusiasm dampened only slightly by the thought that he could have grabbed first place. Perez has been reported as saying that a win had been possible as he caught up to Alonso, but he touched the curb and went onto the wet side of the track causing him to lose time. Perez went on to say that although they would have liked to have gathered more points this weekend, he was nevertheless on the podium for the second race in a row and so had no reason to complain.

The Malaysian F1 Grand Prix was interrupted by a tropical downpour just six laps into the race. Light rain fell in the closing laps, with the race coming to an end at 06h48 local time. Following the restart, drivers changed from full wet to intermediate tires with pit teams working frantically to get the drivers back on the track. Alonzo took the lead, building his advantage to 7.7 seconds. Perez was just 1.3 seconds behind Alonso when both went into the pits to change to dry-weather tires. Excitement mounted as Perez was just a half a second behind Alonzo with only seven laps to go. Just as it appeared the young Mexican driver may take the lead, Perez made contact with a slippery curb allowing Alonso the opportunity to take the checkered flag, with Perez following 2.2 seconds behind him to clinch second place.

Jackie Stewart

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Jackie Stewart aka The Flying Scot is a renowned Formula One driver from the ’60s and ’70s. Stewart took home 3 world titles and participated in the Can-Am championship. After his career as a race car driver ended he went on to become a popular commentator, consultant and team owner.

Sir John Young Stewart, OBE was born on 11 June 1939 in West Dunbartonshire. Stewart’s interest in cars was piqued at an early age as his family owned Dumbuck Garage in Milton. His father had previously been a motorcycle racer and his brother Jimmy was an increasingly popular race car driver. In 1953 he competed in the British Grand Prix with team Ecuri Ecosse. Although his parents discouraged their sons from racing after Jimmy was injured, Jackie accepted an offer by Barry Filer to test his cars at Oulton Park. During the test runs Jackie Stewart left a major impression on the spectators. Ken Tyrrell of Cooper soon heard of Jackie and quickly contacted his brother to organize a tryout. Tyrrell was suitably impressed by Stewart’s fast times and asked him to join the team in 1963.

In 1964 Jackie Stewart took part in Formula Three and had his first win at Snetterton Motor Racing Circuit. In 1965 he joined BRM so as to compete in Formula One. He debuted in South Africa and later gained a victory at the BRDC International Trophy. Unfortunately in 1966 he would have won the Indianapolis 500 had it not been for a mechanical problem and thus he was given the honor of Rookie of the Year. During the Belgian Grand Prix of 1966 Stewart was involved in a terrible crash due to rainy weather. The marshals were unable to help him, so his teammate Graham Hill rescued him. Because of this event Jackie Stewart began a campaign to improve safety in motor racing. Removable steering wheels and a main electrics switch became mandatory and BRM provided a medical truck.

In 1968 and 1969 Stewart drove F1 for Ken Tyrrell. Behind the steering wheel of a Matra MS80 Jackie Stewart became the 1969 World Champion. He once again became World Champion in 1971 and 1973. During his racing career, Jackie Stewart received great recognition including the Sports Illustrated “Sportsman of the Year” award and BBC’s “Sports Personality Of The Year” in 1973. In 2001 Stewart received the title Sir. Even after retiring as an F1 driver Jackie Stewart, The Flying Scot, has gone on to exert an influence on the sport.

Jackie Stewart: The Flying Scot – Auto Racing

September 15, 2006 by  
Filed under Features

Sir Jackie Stewart, popularly known as “The Flying Scot“, is one of auto racing’s most distinctive personalities as well as being one of its most successful racing drivers. His unmistakable Scottish accent, high-pitched voice and boundless enthusiasm have made him the model for a host of race broadcasting parodies. In addition to bringing the world of auto racing, especially >Formula One racing, to a wider audience worldwide, Stewart has been a tireless promoter of race safety and driver protection.

Born in 1939 in Scotland in the county of West Dunbartonshire near Glasgow and Loch Lomond, Stewart may be said to have cars in his blood: his father ran a local garage where young Jackie apprenticed as a mechanic and his family were Jaguar dealers. His older brother Jimmy was a promising auto racer who competed in the 1953 British Grand Prix for Ecurie Ecosse (Team Scotland). By 1963, Jackie had been signed by Ken Tyrell to the Cooper racing team, swiftly moving up the ranks until 1965 when he joined BRM’s Formula One team alongside English racer Graham Hill. Stewart won his first race at the Monza circuit in Italy.

Success came quickly for “The Flying Scot”, and by the end of the decade Jackie Stewart had emerged as a force to be reckoned with on the world’s Formula One circuits. Driving his trademark French Blue number 3 Tyrell car, Stewart captured the Formula One Championship title in 1969, 1971 and 1973 when he achieved his record setting 27th victory. With one race to go before reaching the magic number of 100, Jackie Stewart retired from auto racing to become a consultant and commentator. In honor of his many accomplishments both on and off the track, Jackie Stewart was voted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1990 and was knighted by the Queen in 2001.