2013 F1 Canadian Grand Prix

May 17, 2013 by  
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Taking place at Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve in Montreal, the F1 Canadian Grand Prix covers a distance of 305.270 km (70 laps). Friday and Saturday (7 & 8 June) feature practice and qualifying sessions with the race taking place on Sunday 9 June. The current F1 lap record of 1:13.622 was set by Rubens Barrichello in 2004. For more information visit formula1.com

Date: 9 June 2013
Venue: Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve
City: Montreal
State: Quebec
Country: Canada

Force India F1 Team

March 23, 2010 by  
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Formed in October 2007 by a consortium of Indian businessmen, Force India F1 Team has evolved from the Jordan Grand Prix team established by Eddie Jordan in 1991. At that time the team enjoyed a measure of success, but financial woes led to the sale of team to the Midland group in 2005 resulting in it being renamed Midland F1 Racing. The ink had barely dried on the contract, when the team was sold to Spyker Cars near the end of the 2006 season, less than a year after being acquired. Ownership changed again at the end of the 2007 F1 season, with the name changing to Force India Formula One Team.

Following all the upheaval of the previous years, the 2008 F1 season got underway with Giancarlo Fisichella and Adrian Sutil as drivers, and Vitantonio Liuzzi, Roldan Rodriguez and Giedo van der Garde as test drivers for Force India. The team looked set to score its first point at Monaco with Adrian Sutil in fourth place, but he collided with Kimi Räikkönen near the end of the race. Sutil was found to be at fault.

The same drivers were retained by Force India for the 2009 F1 season. The 2009 Chinese Grand Prix almost presented Sutil with the team’s first points, when Sutil’s car aquaplaned in the wet weather and crashed with just six laps to go. Later that same year, at the Belgian GP, Fisichella finished the race less than a second behind winner Kimi Räikkönen, thereby earning Force India’s first podium finish and first F1 championship points. Test driver Liuzzi stepped in as team driver in September 2009 when Fisichella moved over to Scuderia Ferrari for the rest of the season. Liuzzi qualified seventh for the 2009 Italian Grand Prix, with Sutil qualifying second. Sutil passed the finish line fourth on race day, with Liuzzi forced to retire due to gear box failure on his car. The team finished the season in ninth place.

On February 9 Force India unveiled its new car for the 2010 season – the VJM03. Adrian Sutil and Vitantonio Liuzzi will be the team’s drivers, with Paul di Resta as the team’s test driver. The first race of the season in Bahrain saw Liuzzi finishing in ninth position and scoring 2 points, while Sutil came in twelfth, after recovering from an incident in the first lap. Fans are no doubt interested to see the progress of Force India in the 2010 F1 Championship season.

Bruno Senna

March 22, 2010 by  
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Born in São Paulo, Brazil, on 15 October 1983, as the nephew of three-time Formula One world Champion, Ayrton Senna (21 March 1960-1 May 1994), it seems that Bruno Senna Lalli had racing in his blood from the start. Pitting his skills against those of his uncle (the brother of his mother Viviane) on the family farm while racing in go-karts, it was clear to all that Bruno had great potential for a career in auto racing. The death of his uncle at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix put a stop to him pursuing a racing career at that time, and the family was dealt another blow when his father, Flávio Lalli, lost his life in a motorcycle crash in 1996.

In 2004 Bruno Senna received, as a gift from a family friend, a replica of his uncle’s 1986 Lotus 98T which he drove at the 2004 F1 Brazilian Grand Prix in São Paulo. From there his driving career took off as he competed in the last three events of the British Formula BMW Championship that year. For the following two years, Senna competed in the British Formula Three season with some success, finishing third in the standings in 2006, having earned three pole positions and five victories.

Upon switching to the GP2 series in 2007, Senna clocked up one race win, as well as two second places, ending the season eighth in the championship. 2008 proved to be a good year for Senna as he ended his second GP2 season with two victories and runner-up to Giorgio Pantano. It was in 2008 too, that Senna made his unsuccessful F1 test debut for Honda. Having missed out on an F1 drive, in 2009 Senna signed with Oreca and competed in the Le Mans Series, including the legendary Le Mans 24-hour race.

After announcing that he had signed a deal to race for Campos Meta in the 2010 F1 Championship series, the team changed hands resulting in some uncertainty as to whether contracts would be honored by the new owner, Spanish businessman José Ramón Carabante. However, on 2 March 2010, it was announced that the team’s name would change to Hispania Racing, with Bruno Senna and Karun Chandhok as drivers.

When Ayrton Senna left McLaren at the end of 1993, he was quoted as having said: “If you think I’m fast, just wait until you see my nephew Bruno.” With such an endorsement, we can be sure that many will be following Bruno Senna’s career with great interest.

Japanese Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Japanese Grand Prix is synonymous with the words, excitement, thrilling and controversy. Since it hosted its first Formula One Japan has frequently been at the end of the season, and has been the scene of joy and heartbreak for years. The Japanese Grand Prix has seen many Championship crowns won and has seen many of them lost. So, with being the last race of the season, and an extremely challenging and nail biting circuit, the Suzuka Circuit has been host to a number of Championship decider races and seen title destinies fulfilled. The Suzuka Circuit, host of the Japanese Grand Prix, is completed in 53 laps and is a total race length of 307.57 kilometers.

Approximately forty miles outside Yokohama, lies the Fuji Speedway – the venue that hosted the very first Formula One Japanese Grand Prix, in the year 1976. The decider between legendary drivers Niki Lauda and James Hunt, shot this event to fame. Lauda had experienced a near fatal accident earlier in the racing season at the German Grand Prix. The track was overwhelmed by monsoon conditions, and Lauda chose to withdraw from the race. Hunt needed to take third position in order to win the championship, which he did. Hunt also won the 1977 Japanese Grand Prix. During the race Ronnie Peterson and Gilles Villeneuve collided with each other, which caused Villeneuve’s Ferrari to be thrown into a somersault that resulted in the death of a marshal. Formula One would not have the Japanese Grand Prix on their racing schedule, for the following decade.

In 1987, the Formula One races returned to Japan, but this time, the venue was at Suzuka Circuit, located to the south west of Nagoya. Honda owned the track that was designed by John Hugenholtz, and was constructed inside a funfair. Honda used the Suzuka Circuit as a test track. It is also the only track on the Formula One circuit that is designed in a figure eight. And with the return of the Grand Prix, Suzuka did not disappoint. Nigel Mansell was set to win the Championship, but he unfortunately crashed his Williams-Honda, and Nelson Piquet, Mansell’s teammate, walked away with the championship. But amongst the different events, it is the feud that took place between legendary drivers Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost that will forever be etched into the history of the Japanese Grand Prix. The year was 1989, and Ayrton Senna was trying to overtake Prost. He needed to pass Prost if he was going to win the Championship. This risky move had Prost swerving into Senna, and both drivers out of the race. Alain Prost won the Championship. In 1990, Ayrton Senna repaid Prost by bumping him off the track, and winning his World Crown.

Suzuka was home to the nail-biting duels between Mika Hakkinen and Michael Schumacher, as well as being the scene of Schumacher’s first World Title, won for Ferrari. Due to the typhoon that was experienced in 2005, the FIA announced on 24 March 2006, that all future Japanese Grand Prix’s, will be held at the Fuji Speedway which had been redesigned by Hermann Tilke. Reportedly this news was not welcomed by drivers who counted Suzuka as one of their favorite tracks. In September 2007 it was announced that, beginning in 2009, the F1 Grand Prix would alternate between the two tracks.

The 2009 Japanese Grand Prix saw Lewis Hamilton take the victory in heavy rain. Second place was claimed by Heikki Kovalainen, with Kimi Räikkönen coming in third, making it the first time in F1 history that two Finnish drivers stood on the podium together. The 2008 Japanese Grand Prix was won by Fernando Alonso, with the 2009 victory going to Sebastian Vettel. The 2010 F1 Grand Prix will take place at Suzuka on 8-10 October, with spectators and drivers looking forward to seeing the action on one of the F1 Championship’s favorite tracks.

Spanish Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Spanish Grand Prix is held annually at the outstanding Circuit de Catalunya in Barcelona. Forming a part of the Formula One championship, the Spanish Grand Prix is attended by large crowds of eager F1 fans. The Circuit de Catalunya certainly provides the ideal setting for a day at the races, with convenient facilities and excellent views of the thrilling Formula One Action.

In October of 1986 the Catalan parliament decided to begin construction on Barcelona’s very own international racing circuit. Following the purchase of a suitable piece of land, work started on the impressive circuit in 1989. The first ever Spanish Grand Prix to be held at Circuit de Catalunya took place in 1991 in the month of September. It was a very exciting race indeed, with Nigel Mansell taking first place.

This is just the recent history of the Spanish Grand Prix though. In fact, racing began in Spain right back in 1908 with the Catalan Cup. A permanent oval was opened at Sitges in 1923. On 28 October 1923 the second Spanish Grand Prix was held (the first had been a decade earlier). The original Spanish Grand Prix did not take place according to the standard Grand Prix formula at that time, its rules were more like those used for touring cars. The next Spanish Grand Prix was only held in 1926. After years of war the F1 World Championship came to Spain in 1951. For some time the Spanish Grand Prix alternated between the F1 circuits of Montjuic and Jarama. Spanish Grand Prix had a revival in 1991 when Circuit de Catalunya was opened. In no time at all the new circuit in Barcelona became a popular testing ground. Today it remains the host of the Spanish Grand Prix.

Circuit de Catalunya’s 15 grandstands ensure that there is plenty of place for spectators during the Spanish Grand Prix. Large screen televisions around the circuit provide outstanding views of all the fast action. Plenty of public transportation is available to arrive at the Grand Prix on time. Certainly, if you have the opportunity, you don’t want to miss the Spanish Grand Prix.

The Spanish Grand Prix at Catalunya consists of 65 laps around the 4.727 km circuit, totalling 307.324 km. The circuit’s lap record is held by Michael Schumacher who set it in 2004 at 1:17:450. Spanish racing hero Fernando Alonso was the 2006 winner of the Spanish Grand Prix. Following is a list of other winners: Kimi Raikkonen (2005, 2008); Michael Schumacher (2001, 2002, 2003, 2004); Mika Hakkinen (1998, 2000); Filipe Massa (2007); and the most recent win going to Jenson Button (2009). The 2010 Spanish Grand Prix is set to take place on 7-9 May, so don’t miss the opportunity to enjoy one of the world’s most exciting sports, in one of the world’s most hospitable countries.

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