Formula One Races

February 9, 2009 by  
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The exhilarating motor sport of Formula One Racing has captured the hearts and minds of thousands all over the world. This high-ranking form of motor racing is considered by many to be the most difficult and dangerous. It is also a premier form of motor sport – one in which the drivers have to work their way up through the various ranks of racing in order to be deemed worthy to compete as a Formula One driver. Almost every facet of the sport is expensive, and many drivers consider it a privilege to be chosen by certain top-rated F1 teams. However the term ‘money makes money’ is certainly true of the sport and companies and teams know that winning is pivotal to success and longevity. Thus, Formula One races are organised into a number of Grand Prixs which are held across the globe each year. Teams may choose to compete at only local Grand Prix events, but the chances of success and prestige are increased when they tackle as many Grand Prixs as possible. In addition, top drivers prefer to race for teams which will give them the chance to race as much as possible – especially since it will mean that they can compete for the much coveted “World Championship” prize. Winning such a prize is not only beneficial for the driver – but also for the team responsible for producing and supporting the car carrying the driver accross the finish line. This further increases the team’s prestige, sponsorship and support and ensures their longevity.

If you are Formula One fan, you will already be aware of the fact that there are dozens of Grand Prixs held each year in virtually every corner of the globe. Teams may travel to different continents as they race at the various Grand Prixs held in different countries. European events such as the Monaco Grand Prix, the Belgian Grand Prix, the Italian Grand Prix, the Hungarian Grand Prix, the German Grand Prix, the French Grand Prix, the Spanish Grand Prix, the San Marino Grand Prix and the British Grand Prix enjoy broad coverage. Further afield, the Malaysian Grand Prix, the Chinese and Japanese Grand Prix, the Australian Grand Prix and the South African Grand Prix also enjoy good support. In the Americas, the Canadian Grand Prix and the US Grand Prix take top priority. Why not find out more about each of these great races by looking at the brief description we have listed on our site?

Top Formula 1 Races

Australian Grand Prix

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Formula One Australian Grand Prix is currently held at Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit located in Melbourne’s Albert Park. In the past the races hosted open wheel racing, in the Formula One style, but they were not part of the World Championships. Venues also alternated a great deal, with Albert Park, being very popular in the 1950s. Local drivers would often compete against the world class drivers of the time., but this form of racing came to an end in 1984.

In 1985, the Australian Grand Prix became a part of the World Championships, and therefore, a part of Formula One racing. The last race of the season was raced on the Adelaide street circuit. This street circuit was not as narrow and challenging as the circuit in Monaco, but nevertheless proved to be quite a challenge for drivers and their cars. In 1986, one of the most memorable Australian Grand Prix took place here. At that time,Nigel Mansell only needed a third place to win the championship. Also fighting for the much coveted title was Alain Prost and Nelson Piquet. With Mansell in the lead and only a few laps to the finish, everyone thought that they knew the outcome. The Williams car that Mansell was driving, suddenly had a mechanical failure, sending Mansell with sparks flying, off the circuit. Prost, then took the lead, to win the race and the championship. He too, almost did not make it, as he ran out of fuel on his warm down lap.

In 1995, the Adelaide Street Circuit held its last Formula One Australian Grand Prix, to the disappointment of many. This was a very popular street circuit amongst the drivers, and the teams thoroughly enjoyed the circuit’s atmosphere. In 1993, together with the Australian Grand Prix chairman Ron Walker, politician and premier of Victoria, Jeff Kennett, announced that the Formula 1 Australian Grand Prix would be moved to Albert Park. A significant amount of money was spent to rebuild the circuit, and it led to protests and controversy. Many people believed that the funds would have been better spent by erecting a permanent circuit, rather than using a street circuit, and that the benefits outlined to support the Albert Park renovations, were exaggerated and not completely true. Although a permanent circuit has never been seriously considered, the Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit still attracts plenty of spectators. The Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit is completed in 58 laps and is a total race length of 307.57 kilometers.